Lonely Planet Writer

These upcycled accommodations will transform your idea of glamping

What does glamping mean to you? A safari chic tent overlooking a Big Five wildlife reserve in Africa? “Roughing it” in a cabin outfitted with a gourmet kitchen and theater room?

A converted grain silo in Illinois. Image by Glamping Hub

For those of us seeking to lessen our carbon footprint and partake in a trip not quite as indulgent but every bit as memorable, this can still be a little over the top. But one company is now aiming to make similar sojourns more guilt-free.

Glamping Hub, a company that rents quirky accommodations from tree houses and yurts to domes and tents, now has a collection of upcycled venues. Since the company launched in 2013 they’ve sought out commercial storage stages and other places for environmentally-minded guests to lay their head.

Fancy staying in a shipping container in Florida? Image by Glamping Hub

“As shipping containers take the lead in unique glamping trends, we will see more and more added,” says CEO David Troya. “They are inexpensive and portable, making them an attractive selection; hosts and guests alike are also interested in ecotourism, to which upcycled accommodations appeal as well.” Jupiter, Florida is the site of a vacation home comprised of three upcycled shipping containers that can fit up to eight guests.

How about a caboose on the Blue Ridge Mountains? Image by Glamping Hub

Other unexpected repurposed options include a converted grain silo in Alvin, Illinois dating back to the 1950s that’s located on a working soybean, corn and wheat farm. Near Shoshone, California, two boats have been repurposed into an artistic, eclectic, cozy space for four. And three cabooses on one site in Virginia’s Blue Mountains are fully decked out with jacuzzis, oversized rockers and charcoal grills.

Round Top Texas repurposed glamping. Image by Glamping Hub

In Round Top Texas you can rent an eco-friendly rental adorned with antique goods and materials like cabinets made from university laboratory floors and auctioned goods like doors, photography and decorations from 1960s-era wholesale warehouses.

“No two are alike; they are each physically and historically different from one another, therefore the guest’s experience will be different depending on where they choose to stay,” says Troya. “Upcycled accommodations are a creative solution for an existing, possibly unused, and/or forgotten structure, they are a second chance at making something remarkable again.”