Lonely Planet Writer

Sketches of the most beautiful London Tube stations

When you use the London Tube to commute daily in and out of the United Kingdom’s capital, you might not notice the stations you’re passing through. But “many of [them] were ahead of their time when they were built, and many others have been added to the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest.”

Budget-expert group Pound Place offers this as an explanation for their latest project, Tube Architecture collecting 82 of the most beautiful stations out of the 270 that make up the London Underground system. Artist and illustrator Luis Gomez Feliu drew a pen-and-paper sketch of each of the 82 stations, in an invitation “to see [these] Tube stations in a new light and to explore the oldest metro system in the world with the eyes of a tourist.”

You can see fifteen sketches in the gallery down below, and explore the rest of them at the official project website here.

Aldwych Station is actually closed, but it appears as open and functional in various movies. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Aldwych Station is actually closed, but it appears as open and functional in various movies. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Kennington Station was the first to have an electric lift. The huge dome used to contain the gears of the hydraulic lift that preceded it. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Kennington Station was the first to have an electric lift. The huge dome used to contain the gears of the hydraulic lift that preceded it. Image courtesy of Pound Place
From the outside, Loughton Station might look like a cinema, but the barrel-vault roof inside gives it the feeling of a church. Image courtesy of Pound Place
From the outside, Loughton Station might look like a cinema, but the barrel-vault roof inside gives it the feeling of a church. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Chesham Station is the loneliest of all the network, since it's found the furthest away from its closest neighbour out of all Tube stations. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Chesham Station is the loneliest of all the network, since it's found the furthest away from its closest neighbour out of all Tube stations. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Earl's Court Station is the site of the last remaining blue police telephone box (which must obviously be the TARDIS). Image courtesy of Pound Place
Earl's Court Station is the site of the last remaining blue police telephone box (which must obviously be the TARDIS). Image courtesy of Pound Place
Maida Vale Station was one of the many designed by Leslie Green, one of the first architects to work on Tube stations. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Maida Vale Station was one of the many designed by Leslie Green, one of the first architects to work on Tube stations. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The design for Canary Wharf Station is strikingly modern, and pays lot of attention to the use of light and glass. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The design for Canary Wharf Station is strikingly modern, and pays lot of attention to the use of light and glass. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The fancy canopy of Barons Court Station, as well as its original platform benches, is truly a step back in time. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The fancy canopy of Barons Court Station, as well as its original platform benches, is truly a step back in time. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The original Aldgate East Station was demolished in 1938, and while new platforms were dug out trains ran on railways suspended from the ceiling. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The original Aldgate East Station was demolished in 1938, and while new platforms were dug out trains ran on railways suspended from the ceiling. Image courtesy of Pound Place
If you're looking for Sherlock Holmes, then the tiles inside of Baker Street Station are the perfect place to find him. Image courtesy of Pound Place
If you're looking for Sherlock Holmes, then the tiles inside of Baker Street Station are the perfect place to find him. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The house along the street is just a façade, since the original was demolished to allow steam from Tube trains to pass smoothly up into the air. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The house along the street is just a façade, since the original was demolished to allow steam from Tube trains to pass smoothly up into the air. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The architect simply reversed its design for Cockfosters Station, at the opposite end of the Piccadilly Line. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The architect simply reversed its design for Cockfosters Station, at the opposite end of the Piccadilly Line. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Artist John Maine created new façades and paving for the station during a pre-London Olympics refurb. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Artist John Maine created new façades and paving for the station during a pre-London Olympics refurb. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Oxford Street's entrance to the Bakerloo line was also designed by Leslie Green, and it's now squashed beneath a tower of modern offices. Image courtesy of Pound Place
Oxford Street's entrance to the Bakerloo line was also designed by Leslie Green, and it's now squashed beneath a tower of modern offices. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The Tube station at Waterloo is part of the largest railway station in the UK. Image courtesy of Pound Place
The Tube station at Waterloo is part of the largest railway station in the UK. Image courtesy of Pound Place