Must see attractions in Hammamet

  • Sights in Hammamet

    Centre Culturel International de Hammamet

    Built by Romanian millionaire George Sebastian in the 1920s, Hammamet’s International Cultural Centre used to be the ultimate party house. The whitewashed villa and lush landscaped gardens caught the eye of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, who supposedly said it was one of the most beautiful places he knew, but he'd be disappointed today, as the mansion has an air of neglect. The lack of signage means you'll be tipping a caretaker if you want to learn anything.

  • Sights in Hammamet

    Pupput

    Pupput looks like a barren field sandwiched between two hotels, but it once had more prestige as a staging post on the Roman road from Carthage to Hadrumètum (Sousse). The ruins aren't extensive, signage is minimal and the site is wholly unloved; however, you can see some decent examples of quotidian mosaic work, especially in the House of Figured Peristyle and the thermal baths. Monochrome swastikas cover the ground in the dining room at the House of the Black and White Triclinium.

  • Sights in Hammamet

    Kasbah

    This square fortress, constructed of rammed earth and masonry, dates back to the 9th century, but it was heavily modified in the 1400s to become the city governor’s residence. Adapted for firearms in the 16th century, it was in military use right up to the 1800s. Stroll the ramparts for sweeping views over the tangled lanes of the medina or watch the waves roll in from the small (and overpriced) cafe.

  • Sights in Hammamet

    CarthageLand

    The first theme park in North Africa, CarthageLand is made up of five incongruous worlds where you can battle out the Punic Wars in bumper cars, shoot a laser gun from Aladdin's lamp, circle King Kong on a roller coaster or catch up on 3000 years of Mediterranean history in a sound-and-light show. The Ali Baba area and Aqualand water park are specifically designed for young kids, making this a good stop when they're bored of the beach.