Must see attractions in Aarhus

  • Top ChoiceSights in Aarhus

    ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum

    Inside the cubist, red-brick walls of Aarhus’ showpiece art museum are nine floors of sweeping curves, soaring spaces and white walls showcasing a wonderful selection of Golden Age works, Danish modernism and an abundance of arresting and vivid contemporary art. The museum's cherry-on-top is the spectacular Your Rainbow Panorama, a 360-degree rooftop walkway offering views of the city through its glass panes in all shades of the rainbow.

  • Top ChoiceSights in Aarhus

    Den Gamle By

    The Danes’ seemingly limitless enthusiasm for dressing up and re-creating history reaches its zenith at Den Gamle By. It’s an engaging, picturesque open-air museum of over 70 half-timbered houses brought here from all corners of Denmark and reconstructed as a provincial market town from the era of Hans Christian Andersen. It also includes a recreated neighbourhood from 1974.

  • Top ChoiceSights in Aarhus

    Moesgaard Museum

    Don't miss the reinvented Moesgaard Museum, 10km south of the city, housed in a spectacularly designed, award-winning modern space. The star attraction is the 2000-year-old Grauballe Man, whose astonishingly well-preserved body was found in 1952 in the village of Grauballe, 35km west of Aarhus. Aside from the Grauballe Man, the museum brings various eras (from the Stone Age to the Viking era) to life with cutting-edge archaeological and ethnographic displays.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Aarhus Domkirke

    With a lofty nave spanning nearly 100m in length, Aarhus Domkirke is Denmark’s longest church. The original Romanesque chapel at the eastern end dates from the 12th century, while most of the rest of the church is 15th-century Gothic.

  • Top ChoiceSights in Aarhus

    Dokk1

    Opened in 2015 as part of Aarhus' large-scale waterfront regeneration, Dokk1 is the kind of public space Danes excel at, and houses Scandinavia's largest library. It's a great building, home to countless reading nooks, a cafe, kids' play area and an information desk for visitors to the city.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Møllestien

    While you’re exploring the old part of town, be sure to wander along idyllic Møllestien, easily Aarhus’ prettiest street – all cobblestones, pastel-coloured cottages and climbing roses.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Vor Frue Kirke

    Set back from Vestergade, the Church of Our Lady is like a Russian matryoshka (nesting doll), opening to reveal multiple layers. It was here that the original Aarhus cathedral was erected shortly after 1060. That cathedral stood until about 1240, when it was replaced by the current red-brick church, whose main treasure lies in its basement: the vaulted crypt of the original cathedral (enter via the stairs beneath the chancel), uncovered by chance in 1955 during a restoration.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Tivoli Friheden

    Neither as big nor as fabulous as Copenhagen’s major drawcard, Aarhus’ Tivoli is still a fun, wholesome family attraction, full of childhood favourites (dodgem cars and a Ferris wheel) as well as newer, faster rides. You can buy a multi-ride pass (245kr, including admission) and go hard, or pay for each ride individually. The park is at the northern edge of Marselisborg woods, reached on bus 16.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Moesgård

    The Moesgård area, 10km south of the city centre, is a must for the Moesgaard Museum, but the area's natural attractions warrant investigation, too. An enjoyable walking trail, dubbed the ‘Prehistoric Trackway’ (Oldtidsstien) leads from behind the museum across fields of wildflowers, past grazing sheep and through beech woods down to Moesgård Strand, one of Aarhus’ best sandy beaches.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Aarhus Rådhus

    Aarhus’ controversial town hall was co-designed by renowned architect Arne Jacobsen, a pioneer of Danish modernism, and completed in 1942. It’s clad in Norwegian marble and has a distinctive grey appearance. Jacobsen also designed many of the interiors (along with Hans Wegner) – for design buffs, it’s well worth a look inside.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Marselisborg Palace & Park

    Marselisborg Palace is a summer home of the royal family, and when they’re not in residence the public can explore the English-style grounds and rose garden (free admission). When the blue-bloods are here, watch the changing of the guard at noon from a vantage point on the road. The palace is reached on bus 19. The best way to check if the royals are in Aarhus is to ask around. Contact VisitAarhus, or check online for royal family activity (http://kongehuset.dk/en).

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Aarhus Ø

    Aarhus' docklands is a new neighbourhood that's home to some head-turning residential developments – the brilliantly spiky Isberget (Iceberg) has won architecture awards and lots of Instagram fans. The district is worth a wander for some cool sea and city views and excellent architecture. The popular summertime Strandbaren is here. Bus 33 runs out this way, but biking is a good option.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Kvindemuseet

    Denmark is a model for equality, but this hasn’t always been the case. In a fresh, engaging exhibition inside the old town hall, the Women's Museum charts women’s lives in Denmark and their hard-won achievements. It’s inspiring stuff, but it’s not just one for the ladies – families will love the hands-on kids’ exhibits in the ‘History of Childhood’ section. There’s also a pretty cafe here.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Godsbanen

    The renovated Godsbanen freight yard is an alternative cultural hub for the city; it's home to theatre stages, workshops and cafes, and hosts exhibitions, markets and events – it's well worth a look. Live music venue Radar is here.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Botanisk Have

    Behind Den Gamle By is the Botanical Garden, with its funky walk-through greenhouses (one housing a cafe) and recreated Jutland environments. Reach it through an exit from Den Gamle By or directly from Vesterbrogade.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Isberget

    The brilliantly spiky Isberget (Iceberg) residential apartment block has won architecture awards and lots of Instagram fans.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Besættelsesmuseet

    For those interested in the German occupation of Denmark during WWII, the small Occupation Museum is inside the building that the Germans once used to interrogate and house prisoners. It has displays of military equipment, Nazi and Danish propaganda, and insights into everyday life during the war. Labels are in Danish – ask for the explanatory guide in English.

  • Sights in Aarhus

    Vikingemuseet

    There’s more than the expected vaults in the basement of Nordea bank, a stone’s throw from the city's cathedral. In the mid-1960s this site was excavated and artefacts from the Viking era were unearthed. Concise exhibits include a skeleton, a reconstructed pithouse, 1000-year-old carpentry tools and pottery.