Experience hidden Greenland with this new expedition

Despite President Donald Trump’s statements to the contrary, Greenland is not for sale. But the chatter surrounding the American leader’s misguided comments about wanting to purchase it has led to a renewed interest in the island nation.

Greenland fjords. Image: Scores by Sund

Intrepid Travel, a global adventure travel company that offers more than 1500 trips in 120+ countries on every continent, just launched Green Expedition, a dedicated tour of the Greenland that goes beyond the icebergs and wildlife you might spot from a ship--the more traditional way to explore the hard-to-reach destination. Priced at $4854 (€4369) per person, the eight-day trip includes accommodations, transportation, breakfasts and most activities.

“This [trip} offers a real opportunity for local interaction,” says Steph Millington, Intrepid Travel’s Europe product manager. “Pairing the sights from sea with land excursions, travelers will view Greenland’s stunning landscapes—from hikes along the Kangia Coastline to a cruise through the famous Ilulissat ice fjord—and experience local customs and traditional Greenlandic activities on land.”

The colorful houses typical of Greenland. Image: Intrepid Travel

Unique experiences include being welcomed into a local home to enjoy kaffemik, a unique Greenlandic tradition of sweet and conversations, journeying through broken icebergs to the tiny fishing community of Oqaatsut and hiking through archaeological sites, gorges and craggy hillside and discovering the modern capital of Nuuk, where colorful Nordic houses are joined by alternative architecture, artisan clothing boutiques and gourmet restaurants. Travelers will also have the chance to stay on the edge of the Ilulissat Icefjord, watching frosted peaks of icebergs from the shore while you explore the village.

“On the walk through Ilulissat, travelers stop by the harbor where local fisher folk haul in their catch, followed by a visit to the local fish market,” Millington suggests. “Beyond immersing in modern day Greenlandic culture and witnessing the country's natural beauty, travelers can visit the 4000-year-old World Heritage-listed archaeological site of Sermermiut and take a whale safari to spot narwhals, belugas and bowheads.”

Greenland's Northwest Passage. Image: Intrepid Travel

Illulissat also features icebergs aplenty. Guests will pass towering ones that have broken free from the Icefjord during a one-hour cruise towards the small settlement of Oqaatsut, and Ilulissat proper, a three-hour sightseeing tour will get you them close and personal to the 50 gigatons of ice that flow out towards the ocean every year.

Greenland’s tourism industry is still in its infancy, and the country is one of the few remaining that is still considered wild and relatively untouched. “Greenland is one of the few places left in the world that we can describe as truly remote, given that it's the world's largest non-continental island with a small population of fewer than 60,000 people,” Millington muses. “As a destination, Greenland offers stunning nature and a vibrant community of locals excited to welcome tourism into the country.”

For more information and to book your own epic Greenland adventure, visit Intrepid Travel’s website.