Charles Lindbergh's Grave

Charles Lindbergh's Grave information

Lonely Planet review

Charles Lindbergh moved to remote Kipahulu in 1968. Although he relished the privacy he found here, he did occasionally emerge as a spokesperson for conservation issues. When he learned he had terminal cancer, he decided to forgo treatment on the mainland and came home to Maui to live out his final days.

Following his death in 1974, Lindbergh was buried in the graveyard of Palapala Hoʻomau Congregational Church . The church is also notable for its window painting of a Polynesian Christ draped in the red-and-yellow feather capes that were reserved for Hawaii’s highest chiefs.

Lindbergh’s desire to be out of the public eye may still be at play; many visitors fail to find his grave, getting the location mixed up with St Paul’s Church, which sits on the highway three-quarters of a mile south of ʻOheʻo Gulch. Palapala Hoʻomau church is half a mile beyond that.

Charles Lindbergh’s grave, a simple granite slate laid upon lava stones, is in the yard behind the church. The inscription reads simply, ‘…If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea…C.A.L.’

Walk a minute or two past the graveyard to reach a hilltop vantage point with a fine view of the jagged Kipahulu coast – one look and you’ll understand why Lindbergh was so taken by this area.

To get to Palapala Hoʻomau, turn left at the sign for Maui Stables, which is 0.2 miles south of the 41-mile marker and then veer left after the stables. The church is 0.2 miles further.