Many people have taken a greater interest in nature and astronomy now that we are spending so much time at home, thanks to COVID-19. Some parts of the world will get to enjoy a strawberry moon eclipse on 5 June, while others will merely be treated to the glorious sight of the strawberry moon.

Sadly, despite its fruity name, June's full moon won't be red, as its name comes from the strawberry harvest at this time of year. Full moons happen every 29.5 days, and they have names appropriate to the season because Native American tribes originally tracked the changing seasons by the lunar months rather than the solar calendar. June's full moon is also sometimes called the mead moon, honey moon and rose moon.

The full moon eclipse beside the Golden temple in Amritsar
June's full moon is known as a strawberry moon © Narinder Nanu/AFP via Getty Images

On both 4 and 5 June 2020, the moon will look full to the eye, and the crest of the moon’s full phase will occur on 5 June at 19.12 UTC. Those in North America won't be able to see it then as it will be daylight there, but those in Europe, Africa, Asia and parts of Australia will see what is called a penumbral lunar eclipse.

The June full moon sweeps to the north of the Earth’s dark shadow - or penumbra - causing a partial eclipse of the moon. However, it will be so faint that most people won’t be able to tell it is happening while looking at it. The June full moon won’t be visible at all a bit north of the Arctic Circle, where the sun shines for 24 hours. As there is there is no sun at present a bit south of the Antarctic Circle, the June full moon will mimic the midnight sun of summer, according to EarthSky.

So, we may hope for clear skies to enjoy this impending lunar event in all its glory this weekend. Check it out on 5 June, with its crest occurring at 19.12 UTC and GMT, 15.12 EST and 12.12 PT.

Lockdowns are easing globally as the planet adjusts to a new normal. Find out how COVID-19 is changing travel.

You might also like:

Travellers from these 24 countries can visit Estonia without quarantining
Cyprus will cover costs for travellers who get COVID-19 on holiday there

Explore related stories

BOL, CROATIA - JUNE 27: Zlatni Rat beach as seen from the pinewood on June 27, 2021 in Bol, Croatia. Croatia has already reported a 40 percent increase in tourists relative to last year, when the Covid-19 pandemic dampened tourism across the continent. (Photo by Elisabetta Zavoli/Getty Images)
1325790008

Beaches

20 of Europe's most stunning beaches to explore in 2024

Feb 26, 2024 • 8 min read