For many people the shift to remote working is becoming permanent because of the coronavirus, which is all well and good if you have the means to work comfortably from home. But if not, and you're craving a change of scene, the blue skies of Barbados are calling your name with this incentive for remote workers.

Barbados has opened up applications for a new special visa for remote workers who want to work and live there, giving a world of accidental digital nomads a brand new travel goal. 

Promenade at marina of Bridgetown, Barbados.
Barbados' historic and colorful capital, Bridgetown ©Getty Images/iStockphoto

With the pandemic curbing short-term travel, settling down somewhere new might be the perfect way to satiate your wanderlust. A 12-month stay would give eager travelers ample opportunity to immerse themselves in the authentic side of Bajan culture, cuisine, traditions and lifestyle. A side that few flying visitors get to experience while tucked away inside the resorts.

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“COVID-19 has changed the global business landscape as a larger number of people continue to work from home. With this new visa, we can provide workers with an opportunity to spend the next 12-months working remotely from paradise, here in Barbados,” said Barbados’ prime minister, Mia Amor Mottley, in a statement. The three-part application can be filled out online here.

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All travelers arriving into Barbados are required to present a negative COVID-19 test result and must wear a face mask at the airport. Those arriving from high-risk countries must take their test within 72 hours before departure, while visitors from low-risk countries can take it a week before traveling.

This article was originally published on 8 July and updated on 24 July, 2020. 

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This article was first published July 2020 and updated July 2020

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