Must see attractions in Safi

  • Sights in Safi

    Medina

    Safi's walled medieval medina is sliced in two by Rue du Souq, which runs northeast from Bab Lamaasa to Bab Chaaba and is lined with shops. On the southern side of this street, down a twisting alley, are the remains of the 16th-century Cathédrale Portugaise. The Kechla, another structure built by the Portuguese, is located in the medina's southeastern corner. Shops and street stands selling Safi's famous ceramics are clustered around Bab Chaaba.

  • Sights in Safi

    Colline des Potiers

    The earthen kilns and chimneys of Potters’ Hill are clearly seen from Bab Chaaba at the edge of the medina. The skills used here are predominantly traditional and you can wander around the cooperatives and see the potters at work. If a potter invites you in to watch him at work, you’ll be expected to give a small tip (Dh20 should suffice) or buy an item or two from the shop.

  • Sights in Safi

    Qasr Al Bahr

    The ruins of Safi's once-impressive castle are located next to the crashing waves of the Atlantic. Built to enforce Portuguese authority, house the town governor and protect the port, the tower also once housed prisoners who were kept in the basement before being killed or shipped as slaves. Now in an appalling state of disrepair, the castle is closed to the public while it awaits a long-overdue restoration.

  • Sights in Safi

    Cathédrale Portugaise

    Opposite the entrance to the Great Mosque and clearly signed from Rue du Souq, this ruined cathedral dates from 1519 and was built in the Manueline (Portuguese late Gothic) style. Construction was never completed, and most of the structure was demolished after the departure of the Portuguese. All that remains are parts of the choir and a side chapel.

  • Sights in Safi

    Kechla

    Massive Portuguese-built fortress with ramps, garden courtyards and gunnery platforms. Closed to the public at the time of research.