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Latin Quarter activities

$18.48 Cultural & Theme Tours

Bohemian Paris: Latin Quarter Walking Tour

ItineraryThis is a typical itinerary for this productStop At: Sandemans New Europe - Paris, Paris, Ile-de-FranceExplore one of the most famous parts of the "Rive Gauche" (Left Bank) of Paris. The Latin Quarter has been the land of students for over 1000 years, and possibly the world's single greatest source of artistic inspiration.This is where Paris began many centuries ago and continues to be one of the most vibrant areas of the city.During this 2-hour walking tour, travelers will see some of the most amazing spots of the bohemian Paris by visiting the Sorbonne University, the Pantheon, the bookstore Shakespeare and Company, the Hotel Cluny, the oldest cinema in Paris and the magnificent Gardens of Luxembourg. You will also have the opportunity to know: • The Church of Sainte Genevieve • The incredible and real story of Heloise and Abelard • "Midnight in Paris" famous spots • Hemingway's and James Joyce's houses • La Place de la Contrescarpe • La Rue MouffetardDuration: 2 hours

$40.42 Cultural & Theme Tours

Explore the Latin Quarter like a Local - Private walking tour

ItineraryThis is a typical itinerary for this productPass By: Cathedrale Notre-Dame de Paris, Paris, Ile-de-FranceWe start from near Notre Dame cathedral to explore the Latin Quarter of ParisPass By: Eglise Saint Julien Le Pauvre, Paris, Ile-de-FranceDiscover the Medieval remains of old ParisPass By: Place MaubertSee where locals shop for wine, cheese and baguettePass By: Place de la Sorbonne, Paris, Ile-de-FranceFeel the unique atmosphere of the Paris collegesPass By: Luxembourg Gardens, Paris, Ile-de-FranceWander Paris' most luxuriant gardenPass By: PanthéonAnd gaze at the mesmerizing Pantheon, mausoleum of the national heroes.

$103 Private & Custom Tours

Expert-Led Private Tour of Paris' Right and Left Bank

On this Paris orientation tour, in the company of a local guide, we will get an insider orientation tour of the origins of the Right and Left banks, note architectural landmarks on both banks, and weave together relevant highlights from the city's inception to its present day as a modern capital. We will begin on the Rive Gauche, Paris' Left Bank. Its weaving cobblestone lanes, medieval churches, and Bohemian connections give the Left Bank its lingering flair. Once the city's religious center, the Left Bank plays host to a number of churches—notably Saint-Julien-le-Pauvre, Saint-Séverin, and Saint-Germain-des-Prés. We'll use these churches as vehicles to introduce the Left Bank's religious identity, before it transitioned into the lively student-centric neighborhood which gave it its alias: The Latin Quarter. The 12th-century brought the intellectuals to the Left Bank, and they took up residence here, arguably, until the 1960s. Known for academia, and later as a playground for the Lost Generation (read: Hemingway) and the existentially-inclined, this side of the Seine remains steeped in its former intellectual sparkle. We may pass the Jardin du Luxembourg, the Pantheon, or a few of the cafés immortalized in 20th century literature. Crossing the Pont des Arts, we'll immediately note the grand architectural planning that characterizes the Right Bank. Marked by direct influence of centuries of French leaders, and Baron Haussmann's 19th century urban planning, Paris' Right Bank is now known as the city's more hip, international side. The grand columns and ornate decorations that characterize the architecture of Louvre once symbolized the presence of the French kings in the capital city. We'll briefly discuss its evolving nature as we cross the bridge, and head to the orderly courtyard of the Palais Royal. Entering this manicured Parisian park, we'll discuss an overview of the city's evolution from the Middle Ages to the events of the 1789 French Revolution, some of which are tied to this seemingly innocuous haven from the pulse of the streets beyond. Exiting the graceful, treelined park, we'll head towards Les Halles. Once a bustling covered market, this area still carries traces of its former identity in its specialty shops. While this area of the city was redeveloped in the 1960s, Les Halles remains a hub of activity. As we stroll the neighborhoods around this part of the city, we may glimpse the striking modern design of the Centre Pompidou or Église Saint Eustache. As we return to the banks of the Seine, we'll find ourselves in Place du Châtelet, a central square which has evolved into a variety of incarnations over time, yet remains an important focal point on the right bank. Here, we will discuss the differences and similarities between both sides of the Seine, and how these separate halves bring different aspects of this dynamic city together.

$96 Cultural & Theme Tours

Expert-Led Tour Paris' Right and Left Banks

On this Paris orientation tour, in the company of a local guide, we will get an insider orientation tour of the origins of the Right and Left banks, note architectural landmarks on both banks, and weave together relevant highlights from the city's inception to its present day as a modern capital.We will begin on the Rive Gauche, Paris' Left Bank. Its weaving cobblestone lanes, medieval churches, and Bohemian connections give the Left Bank its lingering flair. Once the city's religious center, the Left Bank plays host to a number of churches—notably Saint-Julien-le-Pauvre, Saint-Séverin, and Saint-Germain-des-Prés. We'll use these churches as vehicles to introduce the Left Bank's religious identity, before it transitioned into the lively student-centric neighborhood which gave it its alias: The Latin Quarter. The 12th-century brought the intellectuals to the Left Bank, and they took up residence here, arguably, until the 1960s. Known for academia, and later as a playground for the Lost Generation (read: Hemingway) and the existentially-inclined, this side of the Seine remains steeped in its former intellectual sparkle. We may pass the Jardin du Luxembourg, the Pantheon, or a few of the cafés immortalized in 20th century literature.Crossing the Pont des Arts, we'll immediately note the grand architectural planning that characterizes the Right Bank. Marked by direct influence of centuries of French leaders, and Baron Haussmann's 19th century urban planning, Paris' Right Bank is now known as the city's more hip, international side. The grand columns and ornate decorations that characterize the architecture of Louvre once symbolized the presence of the French kings in the capital city. We'll briefly discuss its evolving nature as we cross the bridge, and head to the orderly courtyard of the Palais Royal. Entering this manicured Parisian park, we'll discuss an overview of the city's evolution from the Middle Ages to the events of the 1789 French Revolution, some of which are tied to this seemingly innocuous haven from the pulse of the streets beyond. Exiting the graceful, treelined park, we'll head towards Les Halles. Once a bustling covered market, this area still carries traces of its former identity in its specialty shops. While this area of the city was redeveloped in the 1960s, Les Halles remains a hub of activity. As we stroll the neighborhoods around this part of the city, we may glimpse the striking modern design of the Centre Pompidou or Église Saint Eustache.As we return to the banks of the Seine, we'll find ourselves in Place du Châtelet, a central square which has evolved into a variety of incarnations over time, yet remains an important focal point on the right bank. Here, we will discuss the differences and similarities between both sides of the Seine, and how these separate halves bring different aspects of this dynamic city together.