Best restaurants in Lima

  • Top ChoiceRestaurants in Lima

    Central

    Part restaurant, part laboratory, Central reinvents Andean cuisine and rescues age-old Peruvian ingredients not used elsewhere. Dining is an experience, evidenced by tender native potatoes served in edible clay. Chef Virgilio Martinez wants you to taste the Andes. He paid his dues in Europe and Asia's top kitchens, but it's his work here that dazzles.

  • Top ChoiceRestaurants in Lima

    Maido

    True artistry and exquisite flavors make Maido an excellent stop for top-notch nikkei (Japanese-Peruvian) fare that has put it on World's Best lists. The menu of chef Mitsuharu ‘Micha’ Tsumura ranges from sushi to tender 50-hour ribs, okonomiyaki (Japanese pancake) and ramen, with a Peruvian accent. Desserts – such as the yucca mochi or a white-chocolate egg with sorbet yolk – delight. It supports sustainable fishing.

  • Top ChoiceRestaurants in Lima

    Astrid y Gastón Casa Moreyra

    The standard-bearer of novoandina cooking in Lima, Gastón Acurio’s flagship French-influenced restaurant, run by Lima native Diego Muñoz, remains a culinary tour de force. The seasonal menu features traditional Peruvian fare, but it’s the exquisite fusion specialties that make this a sublime fine-dining experience. The 28-course tasting menu showcases the depth and breadth of possibility here – just do it.

  • Top ChoiceRestaurants in Lima

    Isolina

    Go old school. This is home-style criollo (spicy Peruvian fare with Spanish and African influences) food at its best. Isolina doesn't shy away from tripe and kidneys, but also offers loving preparations of succulent ribs, causa escabechada (whipped potato dishes with marinated onions) and vibrant green salads on the handwritten menu. Family-sized portions come in old-fashioned tins, but you could make a lighter meal of starters such as marinated clams or ceviche.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    IK

    Combining ancestral traditions with the Peruvian vanguard of molecular gastronomy is a tall order, but most feel that IK pulls it off with style. The restaurant is a tribute to a well-known local chef and its restorative atmosphere of living plants, natural sounds and light projections bring something new to the dining experience. Dishes are well balanced and meticulously presented.

  • Top ChoiceRestaurants in Lima

    ámaZ

    Chef Pedro Miguel's wonder is wholly dedicated to the abundance of the Amazon. Start with tart jungle-fruit cocktails and oversized tostones (plantain chips). Banana-leaf wraps, aka juanes, hold treasures such as fragrant Peking duck with rice. There's excellent encurtido (pickled vegetables) and the generous vegetarian set menu for two is a delicious way to sample the diversity.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    La Mar

    A good-time cevichería (restaurant serving ceviche) with outstanding service and wonderful ceviche and tiraditos (Japanese version of ceviche), alongside a light and fresh chifon chaufa (fried rice). This Gastón Acurio outpost is not much more than a polished cement patio bursting with VIPs. Try the delicious riff on a bloody Mary – the sublime bloody locho, seafood shells and all. Desserts deliver too. It does not take reservations.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    La Panetteria

    One of the neighborhood favorites, this bakery serves up a wide variety of breads, from traditional baguettes and French rolls, to playful experiments such as pesto or aji (Peru’s slightly spicy pepper) loaves and gorgeous pastries. It's busy on weekends with the brunch crowd (eggs aren't on the menu but are available).

  • Restaurants in Lima

    Pescados Capitales

    On a street once lined by clattering auto shops, this industrial-contemporary destination serves some of the finest ceviche around. Try the ‘Ceviche Capital,’ a mix of flounder, salmon and tuna marinated with red, white and green onions, bathed in a three-chili crème. A nine-page wine list offers a strong selection of Chilean and Argentinean vintages.

  • Top ChoiceRestaurants in Lima

    El Bodegón

    Dimly lit with polished hardwood and offering snappy service, this corner taverna feels more Buenos Aires than Lima; we're just thankful it's here. This Gastón Acurio enterprise recaptures home-style Peruvian eating. It's worth sharing several dishes to spread your good fortune. Standouts include a creamy roasted cauliflower served whole and an ultradelectable rocoto relleno (stuffed pepper) with a nutty, rich sauce.

  • Top ChoiceRestaurants in Lima

    Barra Chalaca

    This casual ceviche and seafood bar combines masterful cooking and playful rapport for the win. Watching the prep cooks from your bar stool, order curatodo (cures everything) – a fishbowl of tropical juices and fresh herbs. There's mouthwatering tiradito chichuito (sashimi with capers, avocado and garlic); crisp, lightly battered pejerrey (silverside fish), and seafood fried rice that you can't put down.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    Caleta la Punta

    A must for original, well-prepared (but not spicy) ceviche – the vegetarian mango ceviche won best at the prestigious Mistura food festival. Serves delectable tiraditos (marinated fish slices) and whole fried fish with ample garlic. Maíz chullpi, a typical table snack, is prepared with dried ginger and bay leaf, not oil. With a gregarious family at the helm.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    Origen Tostadores de Cafe

    This artisan coffee shop breaks coffee-making down to a science and has all the chemistry-set-style machines to prove it. Just blocks from Museo Larco, it offers the trifecta of wi-fi, quiet spaces to work or chat and hot or iced caffeinated beverages. Various brewing techniques are used, but the pride is in the beans – Origen works directly with local producers.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    La Picantería

    Just blocks from the famous Surquillo market, diners share two long tables to feast on sea urchin omelette, stuffed rocoto peppers and stewed osso buco. These traditional plates, hailing from both northern and southern Peru, come with an edge. Chef Héctor Solís knows chiles and doles out just enough heat to leave you at the edge of wanting more.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    Matsuei

    Venerated Japanese superchef Nobu Matsuhisa once co-owned this sushi bar. Its new location is posh and atmospheric. Diners come to try some of the most spectacular sashimi and maki (sushi rolls) in Lima. A must-have: the acevichado, a roll stuffed with shrimp and avocado, then doused in a house-made mayo infused with ceviche broth. Your brain will tingle.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    Café Tostado

    Call it a cultural experience. This barely converted auto-repair shop long ago transformed into a bastion of traditional cooking, with long wooden tables and an open kitchen surrounded by scarred iron pots and drying noodles. Daily specials rotate, but the sought-after signature dish is rabbit, which feeds up to three people.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    Panchita

    A Gastón Acurio homage to Peruvian street food in a contemporary setting ringed by folk art. S kewered meats are grilled over an open flame to melt-in-your-mouth perfection, particularly the charred octopus. Another winner is the crisp suckling pig with tacu-tacu (Peruvian fusion dish of rice and beans). There's also a great salad bar. Portions are big and filling so don't come alone. With outstanding service.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    Colonia & Co

    For extraordinary coffee, fresh blended juices and wonderful brunch, come to this cheerful modern cafe. Straight from Seattle, the Slayer espresso machine gets heavy play: order a chapa , with a touch of milk, allspice and honey; it's pure velvet. The comfort-food menu is short but sweet, with gorgeous eggs Benedict, duck with rice and pastel de choclo ( corn casserole).

  • Restaurants in Lima

    La 73

    Named for an iconic local bus, this contemporary bistro serves Peruvian–Mediterranean fare, with sustainable fish. Some dishes seem rushed, but standouts include homemade ravioli with barbecued meat, fluffy rice bowls and duck risotto. The bar serves wine and pisco concoctions, or try the amazing herba luisa lemonade. To end on a sweet note, split the crisp, warm churros for dessert.

  • Restaurants in Lima

    El Punto Azul

    Awash in Caribbean blues, this pleasant family eatery dishes up fresh ceviches, tiraditos (Japanese-style ceviche, without onions) and family-sized rice dishes. Try its risotto with parmesan, shrimp and ají amarillo (yellow chili) – and don’t miss the lineup of beautiful desserts. It gets packed, so show up before 1pm if you want a table. Excellent value.