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Introducing Lake Titicaca

In Andean belief, Titicaca is the birthplace of the sun. In addition, it’s the largest lake in South America and the highest navigable body of water in the world. Banner blue skies contrast with bitterly cold nights. Enthralling and in many ways singular, the shimmering deep blue Lake Titicaca is the longtime home of highland cultures steeped in the old ways.

Pre-Inca Pukara, Tiwanaku and Collas all left their mark upon the landscape. Today the region is a mix of crumbling cathedrals, desolate altiplano and checkerboard fields backed by rolling hills and high Andean peaks. In this world, crops are still planted and harvested by hand. Campesinos wear sandals recycled from truck tires, women work in petticoats and bowler hats, and llamas are tame as pets.

It might first appear austere, but ancient holidays are marked with riotous celebrations where elaborately costumed-processions and brass bands ripcord a frenzy that lasts for days.