Best hotels and hostels in Petra

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Wadi Musa

    Mövenpick Hotel

    This beautifully crafted Arabian-style hotel, 100m from the entrance to Petra, is worth a visit simply to admire the inlaid furniture, marble fountains, wooden screens and brass salvers. As the hotel is in the bottom of the valley there are no views, but the large and super-luxurious rooms all have huge windows regardless. The buffet breakfast and dinner are exceptional. Petals are floated daily in the jardinière, a roaring fire welcomes winter residents to the Burckhardt Library (a lounge on the upper floor) and there’s a pleasant ambience on the roof garden in summer. Big discounts possible in low season.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Wadi Musa

    Rocky Mountain Hotel

    This backpacker-friendly hotel has caught just the right vibe to make it Petra's most successful travellers’ lodge. There’s a cosy communal area with free tea and coffee and the majlis -style roof terrace makes the most of the impressive sweeping views. A free shuttle service to the Petra entrance leaves at 7.30am and 8.30am, returning at 4pm and 5pm. The Anglo-Jordanian couple who run the hotel advise on onward travel and overnight trips to Wadi Rum. They also operate the peaceful Seven Wonders Bedouin Camp. Lunch boxes are available for JD4.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Wadi Musa

    Peace Way Hotel

    This hotel has undergone the most remarkable transformation from budget to boutique. The impressive makeover includes blue-lit ceilings, carved wooden doors and a handsome chocolate brown theme to the corridors and rooms, contrasted with cream-coloured marble. Even more remarkable is that the hotel has kept its budget prices, making this central option very good value. Unusually, it's pet-friendly too.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Wadi Musa

    Petra Guest House Hotel

    Guests can’t get closer to the entrance to Petra without sleeping in a tomb – and indeed the hotel’s famous Cave Bar is located in one. Accommodation ranges from spacious, motel-like chalets or sunny (if cramped) rooms in the main building. The staff are unfailingly delightful and the breakfast buffet is superior to most. Offers excellent value for money.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Wadi Musa

    Cleopetra Hotel

    One of the friendliest and most efficiently run budget hotels in town, Cleopetra has bright, fresh rooms. There’s a communal sitting area in the lobby where wi-fi is available for JD2. The hotel can arrange overnight 4WD trips to Wadi Rum (JD50 per person for a minimum of three) and the ever-helpful Mosleh can organise other transport.

  • Lodging in Little Petra

    Ammarin Bedouin Camp

    A 10-minute walk from Little Petra (signposted off the approach road), this camp is in Siq Al Amti, hidden in a spectacular amphitheatre of sand and hills, and run by the local Ammarin tribe. Accommodation comprises mattress and blankets in a sectioned Bedouin tent with concrete floors, with a clean shower and toilet block. Reservations (booked by email) are essential. It's possible to pitch a tent here and use the camp's facilities (JD20 per person) and there's space to park a campervan (JD32 per night per vehicle, with power). Special zerb dinners (meat cooked in a pit in the ground) can be prepared on request (JD25 extra – ordinary dinner is JD35). The camp offers guided hikes and camel trips in the surrounding hills. A Bedouin guide is JD100 per day or JD50 for the back trail to Petra (for up to five people). There's also a wonderful little ethnographic museum on-site, spotlighting the local Ammarin tribe. In particular, it's interesting to read the story of Torfa Bint Saleh Al Ammarin for an idea of the everyday hardships of life on the desert fringe. The camp offers transfers from Petra Visitor Centre in Wadi Musa (JD10 one way).

  • Lodging in Little Petra

    Seven Wonders Bedouin Camp

    Signposted along a track off the road to Little Petra and tucked discreetly into a hillside, this relaxed and good-value camp looks particularly magical at night when the open fires are burning and the rocks behind the camp are illuminated. Accommodation is in simple but cosy tents with electric light, carpets and mosquito nets. Hot water and towels are available. A range of tasty traditional fare is prepared by locals and sometimes includes dishes from a zerb oven (buried in the ground) and mehndi (barbecue) pits. The camp offers both a guided visit to Little Petra (JD15) and the back trail guided 4WD-hike to the Monastery in Petra (from JD60). Other trips include a two-hour 4WD and hiking excursion (JD60) to a local wadi with impressive rock formations. The camp is run by the same management as the popular Rocky Mountain Hotel in Wadi Musa.

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    P Quattro Relax Hotel

    This new hotel, whose owner has worked in Italy, reveals a European character in its choice of black-and-white decor. Surprisingly for the region, there are three pet-friendly rooms. Piles of luxurious linen, an on-site mini gym, a small roof garden and a restaurant serving authentic Italian fare help contribute to the quality experience at this small, often fully booked hotel.

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    Al Anbat Hotel I

    Located some way out of town, this hotel features large rooms with sunset views, and an attractive lobby and restaurant (buffet lunch or dinner JD10) with a magnificent view. There's a Turkish bath (guests JD15) and free transport to/from Petra. Campers can pitch a tent (JD7 per person with showers and kitchen access); campervans are welcome (JD5 per van plus JD7 per person).

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    Petra Sella Hotel

    This newly renovated hotel has luxurious rooms, decked in stylish stone tiles with split ceilings and marble sinks in the bathrooms – almost boutique for Wadi Musa. There are good views from front rooms but rooms at the back are bigger. The hotel runs the spotless Sella Turkish Bath opposite. Lunch boxes are available for JD8.

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    Petra Palace Hotel

    Located 500m from the entrance to Petra, this attractive and well-established hotel, with its palm-tree entrance, big bright foyer and helpful management, offers rooms around a swimming pool. Corridors and grounds are looking tired but the sociable English Bar and a good restaurant compensate. A mixed Turkish bath (JD20 per person) is open from 8am to 10pm.

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    Petra Panorama Hotel

    Popular with European tour groups, this hotel was designed for the package tourist with its cavernous corridors, unsubtle touches and an abandoned ship atmosphere during the day. That said, the rooms, which cascade in tiers down the mountain, are bright and spacious, if dated. Each room has its own terrace with uninterrupted views for a private sunset.

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    Seven Wonders Hotel

    The rooms at this hotel are decked out with thick carpets and some have balconies with good views over the town and surrounding landscape. There's a terrace with a 'dry' bar (no alcohol served). Book two hours ahead for the hotel's Afra Turkish bath (JD35 per person). Open from 5pm to 10pm, the baths offer sauna, Jacuzzi, steam room and massage.

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    Petra Moon Hotel

    On a hill at the bottom of Wadi Musa, near the entrance to Petra, this hotel with its distinctive pink exterior features modern rooms, big bathrooms and a rooftop swimming pool. A large terrace is a good place to enjoy splendid sunset views and a popular nightly barbecue (JD15, 7pm to 11pm).

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    Al Anbat Hotel II

    This hotel has recently undergone a refurbishment and rooms are now luxurious with new soft furnishings. There are good views across Wadi Musa and the surrounding hills from many of the rooms and the roof terrace. In high season the neighbouring building offers less attractive accommodation but with similarly large and comfortable rooms. There’s an excellent Turkish bath opposite.

  • Lodging in Little Petra

    Little Petra Bedouin Camp

    Signposted just off the main road to Little Petra, this secluded complex in a tree-filled basin surrounded by mountains offers a rural retreat. Accommodation is in army tents that sport proper beds with linen and mattresses with segregated bathroom blocks for women and men. Romantic settings for dinner are dotted around the campsite, including in a cave.

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    La Maison

    The brass jardinières decorating the foyer set the tone for this good-value hotel. Just uphill from the entrance to Petra, tucked up a quiet road behind Tourism St through Lower Wadi Musa, it offers stylish rooms, some brighter than others with 120-degree views. The roof terrace is a great place to catch the sunset in summer.

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    Amra Palace Hotel

    One of the few hotels to boast a garden, this hotel has tried to keep pace with the competition but rooms are beginning to show their age and the construction site opposite mars the view. Services include a pool heated to 28°C, Jacuzzi, summer terrace and Turkish bath (JD15 per person); Wadi Rum packages are also on offer.

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    Silk Road Hotel

    Hand-painted panels of Bedouin camps stretch across the foyer and restaurant walls of this old favourite, 300m from the entrance to Petra. The rooms in lavender hues may not be to everyone’s taste, but they are large with big bathtubs, and most have a view. The buffet lunch (JD10) is popular with tour groups.

  • Lodging in Wadi Musa

    Nabataean Castle Hotel

    Mövenpick runs this opulent choice as a sister hotel to the one near the entrance to Petra. Most rooms have views over the valley, but the windows are surprisingly small and the hotel is often fully booked. There’s a free daily shuttle bus to and from Petra.