Best hotels and hostels in Bogotá Region

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Bogotá

    Hotel Click-Clack

    This high-design haven, the boutique hotel of choice for Colombia's trendsetters, has a sophisticated aesthetic vaguely based around vintage TVs and photographic equipment. The best of the five room sizes (extra small to large) are the 2nd-floor mediums, which open onto spacious patios with small patches of grass and a vertical garden. There's no spa or fitness center: everything here – from Apache, the high-class miniburger bar on the roof, with stupendous views, to 100 Grams, the trendy basement restaurant where everything is served in 100g portions (like larger-size tapas) – is focused on a good time, not on R & R. There's a Lust kit and a Hangover kit in each room, depending on how things go.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Bogotá

    Casa Legado

    Find your way to this renovated 1950s art deco home in Quinta Camacho and you'll fall in love with your host, Helena, and her seven-room dream pad. An exotic fruit garden, a communal dining room and a guest-use kitchen, plus an ivy-draped courtyard, are perfect companions to stylish rooms, decked out according to the personalities of Helena's nieces and nephews. An interior designer by trade, Helena has painstakingly accented the experience with local Colombian products wherever possible (luxurious Loto del Sur amenities, beautiful ceramics from Tybso, aromatic Libertario coffee). There's a lot to love here, not least the treats that are included in the price: gourmet breakfast, food and drinks from the well-stocked kitchen, city bikes, picnic baskets and access to five deluxe common areas.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Bogotá

    Cranky Croc

    Perennial favorite the Cranky Croc, run by a friendly Aussie and styling itself as a backpacker hostel, has kept up with the times and doesn't lack space or natural light, which hits you as soon as you enter the brightly tiled lobby. The four- to 10-bed dorms feature lockers, reading lamps and individual electric outlets for device charging. Ten boutique-hotel-quality private rooms have parquet floors and shiny new bathrooms. Guests often praise the breakfasts (COP$8000 to COP$15,000) for their size and deliciousness. Add a common room with a giant TV, a roof terrace, and activities such as football tours and salsa dancing, and your intro to Bogotá is starting to look very promising. The hostel has also gone green: it now collects and filters rainwater for showering.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Bogotá

    12:12 Hostel

    This artsy hostel epitomizes the cutting-edge Chapinero Alto scene: recycled materials such as discarded bikes, which are mounted like fun-house art installations, and tossed-aside books, which pepper the walls instead of wallpaper, are the backbone of this design-forward choice. The colorful dorm beds are some of Bogotá's most comfortable, with reading lamps, privacy curtains and cozy bedding; the big, modern communal kitchen and slate bathrooms are above and beyond for a hostel.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Bogotá

    Casa Deco

    A 22-room gem run by an Italian emerald dealer, this discerning option is a serious step up from the sea of hostels surrounding it. Rooms come in seven bright colors and are laced with bespoke hardwood art deco–style furniture, desks, futon beds and newly installed soundproof doors and windows. There's a guitarist at breakfast, adorable staff, and a mesmerizing terrace with Monserrate and Cerro de Guadalupe views.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Bogotá

    Masaya Bogotá Hostel

    Taking flashpacker luxury to a new level, this large French-owned hostel has notably comfortable dorms, with privacy curtains, beanbags, and fluffy pillows and duvets, while the hotel-quality private rooms are very spacious and exhibit first-rate wardrobes and flat-screen TVs. You'll also find great common areas, piping-hot high-pressure showers and a wealth of cultural activities, including cooking classes.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Bogotá

    Orchids

    Behind a mauve facade hides La Candelaria's most discerning and upscale choice, an intimate six-room boutique hotel bursting with historic character. Every generously proportioned room has a different design scheme: period furniture (some original to the historic mansion), four-poster beds, porcelain sinks and thick wooden writing desks are just some of the features.

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Casa Bellavista

    Shoehorned into hippy-dippy Callejón de Embudo, this small hostel in a historic house has plenty of antiquated character. Creaky hardwood floors lead to six- to nine-bed dorms that have their own bathrooms, and the three spacious private rooms are chock-full of detail such as original tile flooring – the standout is loft-style with a spiral staircase. Flags, maps and the odd musical instrument embellish the communal areas, where you can sink into a hammock with the wi-fi or ditch the electronics for a game of chess. It's steps from Plazoleta del Chorro de Quevedo, with a facade covered in ever-changing urban graffiti (a giant frog at last visit).

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Four Seasons Casa Medina

    Easily the most interesting of Bogotá's two new Four Seasons hotels (the other is in Zona Rosa, both converted from previous hotels), this Zona G hotel occupies two historic mansions boasting Spanish colonial accents (beamed ceilings, original tiling) and a gorgeous sunlit breakfast room/bar with a lush vertical garden. Four Seasons couldn't change much when it revamped the former Charleston Casa Medina in 2015, but rich hardwood flooring and leather-accented desks, nightstands and antiques in some rooms keep things historically luxurious. The in-house Spanish restaurant, Castanyoles, does a bang-up Sunday brunch with unlimited mimosas (COP$89,000).

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Botanico Hostel

    In a rambling, creaky wooden-floored house once called home by notable Colombian painter Gonzalo Ariza, this new-in-2017 Candelaria offering oozes colonial character and charm. Original touches like wood-beamed ceilings and optimal hang spaces (fire-lit lounge, jungly garden, supreme rooftop with city and mountain views) make leaving difficult; a spacious private room with wood-burning stove doesn't help, either. There's yoga on the rooftop at 10am daily.

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Sofitel

    The Sofitel was gutted and reshined not too long ago (new beds, new TVs, new carpeting); unfortunately, though, soundproof rooms now draped in contemporary white with beige and red pinstripes are certainly modern, but not as sexy as the former Cabernet color schemes. Tasteful Museo del Oro replica items remain in all rooms. Foodies find its Zona Rosa location on a tranquil street with several excellent restaurants hard to beat.

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Fulano Backpackers

    An Italian-Colombian affair inside a historic Quinta Camacho mansion, this boutique hostel is easy on the eyes. It calls on juxtapositions of hardwoods, minimalistic design schemes and artistic bathroom tilings to foster an aesthetically impressive environment for a hostel. DJs, live music sets and spontaneous BBQs on the custom-built grill aren't uncommon, and an air of cultural awareness pervades throughout.

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Cité

    Part of a small Bogotá chain, this 56-room business-hip boutique hotel located between Zona Rosa and Parque 93 boasts rarely seen advantages such as a heated rooftop pool, extra-large rooms with lots of natural light and even some with bathtubs, a true rarity. Perhaps coolest of all is that there are bicycles for guests to use for free – handy as you are on a CicloRuta bike path.

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Anandamayi Hostel

    South of most hostels, this lovely whitewashed and turquoise-trimmed colonial home has very well-furnished rooms with wood-beam ceilings, plenty of wool blankets and colonial furniture. Rooms and the 13-bed dorm surround a few semileafy central stone courtyards with hammocks. A top Candelaria choice for those seeking peace and quiet in their hostel and a less gringo-centric experience.

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Hotel Abadia Colonial

    This immensely pleasant 12-room hotel has well-appointed rooms with colorful Italian down comforters, floor heaters and TVs, plus a palpable sense of colonial style. Breakfast is served in the intimate Italian restaurant, which has lovely outdoor seating on the second-floor terrace. There's even a priceless patch of grass in the sunny back courtyard – rare in La Candelaria.

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Casa Platypus

    Looking like a colonial home brought over from Villa de Leyva, this upscale guesthouse is an ideal flashpacker choice right in the heart of Bogotá. The interior patio exudes charm, the common areas (a handsome breakfast room and a relaxing terrace) invite guest interaction, and the small but tidy rooms come with comfy beds equipped with deluxe headboards.

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Casa Rústica

    This quirky choice in Quinto Camacho is the domain of eccentric owner, Peter, who specializes in Art Réco, a movement that follows the philosophy of one person's trash is another person's treasure. To that end, 80% of this 1950s home is furnished with recycled, discarded and rescued objects. Conceptually, he only takes on monthly pensioners these days, but his two rooms are cozy – think of writers tucking away from civilization for a month – and the idea is novel. Our favorite is the El Altillo, an attic room with exposed brick, slanted ceiling and rooftop views. Rates include a literature workshop and a Kung Fu class (of course it does!).

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    La Pinta

    In an unmarked residential home in a great Chapinero location just steps from La Séptima (Carrera 7), this spotless little secret offers a fantastic back garden, big, modern bathrooms, and colorful down comforters in hardwood-floored rooms that approach boutique-hotel standard. There's a large communal kitchen and a cozy bar. Room 304 is the best double with a garden view.

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Hotel de la Ópera

    One of La Candelaria's poshest hotels – named for the leotard shows at Teatro Colón next door – features restored rooms with sound-proof windows in two historic Spanish-colonial town houses enveloping two courtyards. For best-value, book standard rooms 710 in the art deco annex for superb views and a bathtub; or courtyard-facing 207-208, which have small outdoor balconies.

  • Lodging in Bogotá

    Hostal Sue Candelaria

    Multicolors define Sue Candelaria, from the hammocks and bedspreads to the murals and art. A fine string of rooms includes three- to seven-bed dorms and small private rooms (sleeping two). Regular upgrades have remolded bathrooms and electronics, and there's an appealing sun-drenched courtyard complete with hammocks in the back of the house.