Once part of a sprawling Benedictine monastery, this cenacolo harbours arguably the city’s most remarkable Last Supper scene. Painted by Andrea del Castagno in the 1440s, it is one of the first works of its kind to effectively apply Renaissance perspective. It possesses a haunting power with its vivid colours – especially the almost abstract squares of marble painted above the apostles’ heads – as well as the dark, menacing figure of Judas.

In season, look for occasional additional guided tours of the convent on Wednesday afternoon between 3pm and 5pm; contact nearby Museo di San Marco for information and reservations.