Best hotels and hostels in Hammamet

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Hammamet

    La Badira

    Occupying a small peninsula north of Hammamet proper, the adults-only resort of La Badira is a swanky affair. It's home to Hammamet's largest infinity pool, which peacefully gazes over the tip of town that juts into the Med, but it also has beach access. The immaculate white-and-light-wood rooms have a few Maghrebi touches; some even come with private pools for a surreptitious dip.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Hammamet

    Villa Phoenicia

    The most authentic place to stay in Hammamet, this traditional dar has just four rooms, all named after gems. Service is sweet, and breakfast is fantastic, especially when the owner picks up a few extra Tunisian pastries from Canari or makes home-made strawberry juice. It's a quick walk to the medina and the beach.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Orangers Beach Resort & Bungalows

    Orangers, beloved by Brits, is where the whole family heads for their annual sun pilgrimage. Verdant gardens ring the buildings, and an exclusive section of beach lies just beyond the pool. Garden rooms need sprucing up, but we'd happily take up permanent residence in the freestanding bungalows on the beach, which include private terraces and hammocks. Unsurprisingly, they're booked out long in advance.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    SENTIDO Phenicia

    Built in the 1970s by the presidential architect, this massive 390-room hotel has had a swish overhaul since then. The neat rooms have great views, though they're smaller than those at other luxury Hammamet properties. But when you're spending your days lounging on the private, soft-sand beach, on horseback or playing golf on the hotel's own course, you'll hardly be there anyway.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Russelior Hotel & Spa

    On the (very) short list of Hammamet's most stylish hotels, Russelior is one of the few in town that's actually worth its five stars. Service is impeccable, and its beautiful 3000-sq-metre spa and huge indoor and outdoor pools make up for the fact that its location requires a five-minute walk to get to the beach.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Hasdrubal Thalassa

    Its five stars are slightly tarnished, but the Hasdrubal is still one of the most luxurious options in Hammamet. The enormous, multilevel lobby with painted wooden ceilings is a taste of the huge hotel complex to come, complete with indoor and outdoor pools, a spa and lush gardens leading onto a private stretch of beach. Rooms are spacious and have stately marble-clad bathrooms.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Sindbad

    The Sindbad, seemingly the headquarters for German-speaking visitors to Hammamet, has an exclusive feel and spacious rooms with arabesque design features and textiles. It’s set in green grounds with four pools, including one infinity pool, a private beach club and a restaurant that's so close to the water you'll feel like you might be swept out to sea.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Magic Life Manar

    Popular with families, this resort has enough to keep children entertained for the whole holiday, from pools with storeys-high slides and beach access to an on-site high-ropes course. The bland rooms feel new but like they were done on the cheap. Some have 2m-deep swim-up pools, though you share access with the neighbours.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Saphir Palace & Spa

    Previously managed by luxury chain Sofitel, Saphir has somehow held on to its five stars, though standards have slipped. Two gold pill-shaped lifts whisk visitors from the lobby to marbled rooms, which are still decent enough, but some travellers report a number of annoyances, from unusable wi-fi to a deposit for pool towels and not being allowed to bring bottled water from outside.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Villa Noria

    Set back from the beach but with easy access to the unpeopled white sands that stretch beyond the giant Hasdrubal Thalassa hotel, these domed bungalow-style apartments (for up to four) are set in gardens around a pool and have airy interiors, simple furnishings and small kitchens.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Vincci Flora Park Hotel

    Despite its 100-odd rooms, Flora Park certainly has a more intimate and authentic feel than many of its neighbours. The decor is looking slightly dated, but it’s lovingly maintained, attracts a nice crowd and, while not on the beach, is very close. There’s also a spa. The minimum stay in summer is seven nights.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Hôtel Résidence Romane

    This 42-room family-run hotel offers dated, unfussy rooms with balconies surrounded by greenery. Service is cheerful, and the attached building has restaurants, a shop, a hairdresser and a games room. Full board is offered, otherwise it's a 30-minute walk to the medina.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Maison des Jeunes

    This government-run youth hostel is unsurprisingly institutional in feel, but happily it's both central and beachside, plus for this price, it's an absolute steal. It's often booked out by huge groups far in advance, including in the summer when it's taken over by the government.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Laico Hammamet

    This hotel's cream-coloured, gold-studded central atrium, rooms and pool are reminiscent of a huge 1980s cruise liner that's docked across the street from Yasmine Hammamet's port. The rooms are a bit scuffed up but are in good condition overall.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Dar Hayet

    Its prime beachfront location near the centre make this hotel an attractive option, but its once-vibrant Moorish architecture and sea-view rooms are increasingly dated and rundown. Still, it's a bargain by Hammamet standards.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Résidence Hammamet

    This hotel has a faded air but a great central location and sizeable studios that huddle around a leafy courtyard. Most rooms have kitchenettes, though they don't look like they've been replaced since the 1970s. The hotel isn't beachside, but the water is just 200m away; otherwise a pool with views of the medina awaits on the rooftop.

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Hotel Samaris

    For its location at a chaotic intersection a few kilometres from the beach, this place is surprisingly quiet but only worth staying at if you're on a tight budget. The dark, drab rooms surround an interior courtyard of olive and fig trees. You can also pitch up at the campground (per person 4DT; an additional 4DT for both a car and electricity).

  • Lodging in Hammamet

    Hotel Les Citronniers

    This midsized, frumpy hotel has a relaxing terrace out front, a pool and simple rooms with balconies. Guests have access to a private beach hidden behind the buildings across the street.