Best hotels and hostels in Vanua Levu & Taveuni

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Taveuni

    Dolphin Bay Divers Retreat

    Tucked away in a jungly cove on Vanua Levu (but best accessed from Taveuni), this is a fantastically remote place with simple bure and permanent safari tents. Divers, aware of the excellent location and great reputation of the diving outfit here, make up most of the guests; there’s also good snorkelling from the stunning beach. The food is delicious (optional meal plan $105). The resort is only accessible by boat, and transfers must be arranged in advance. Transfers from Taveuni Wharf are $40, and $65 from Buca Bay; in a pinch, staff will also pick you up from Savusavu (extra costs apply). The resort is in the process of moving to Viani Bay (about 10 minutes south); dive operations are set to commence there in April 2016, with accommodation to open in December; the present location will remain fully operational until then. It also plans on building 20 yacht moorings.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Savusavu & Around

    Gecko Lodge

    Gecko's is a fantastic new budget option that combines Savusavu convenience (it's a three-minute drive to town) with away-from-it-all serenity and scenic vistas. The three colourful rooms-with-a-view are all very big, air-conditioned, and have their own en suite and fridge: there's a great communal kitchen too, though the hugely hospitable owners prepare fantastic meals upon request ($15). It also offers Indian cooking lessons. Bikes and kayaks are complimentary; unusually for Fiji, so is the wi-fi. It's a pleasant 15 minute walk to town.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Savusavu & Around

    Fiji Beach Shack

    These are seriously glam: the two-level ‘House of Bamboo’ has two bedrooms and a fabulous bathroom complete with a sunken bath and sea views from two large windows. There’s a great DVD library and a good selection of children’s board games (the house isn’t suitable for very young children though). The ‘Pod House’ is an extremely private one-bedroom overlooking the bay. Both have a plunge pool, a deck and a day bed. You can snorkel out to gorgeous Split Rock from the beachfront across the road.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Savusavu & Around

    Salt Lake Lodge

    For peace and personalised service, this remote lodge is tough to beat. Sitting on a 5-acre organic farm beside the Qaloqato River, the timber complex is yours alone, as are a personal chef, maid and all the fresh fruits and veggies you can pick. It's an absolutely idyllic location, and opportunities abound to explore it on fishing, snorkelling and kayaking trips. There’s a strong eco ethos here: rainwater is used for bathing and cooking, and there’s 24-hour solar power.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Taveuni

    Bibi’s Hideaway

    A rambling, quiet two-hectare hillside plot hides a selection of adorable, colourful bures in varying sizes among the fruit trees. Charming host Paulina will welcome you with a heaving fruit platter; once you've polished that off, you're welcome to pick as much as you can gorge. There are fantastic self-catering facilities here and plenty of room for exploring. A brilliant choice, especially for families.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Taveuni

    Maqai Beach Eco Surf Resort

    A private white-sand beach, excellent snorkelling, epic waves and nightly entertainment: believe it or not, this is a backpackers. Accommodation is in sturdy, clean safari tents and shared bures: meals (compulsory meal plan $89) are taken in a common area with sand floors, couches and a pool table. There’s a boat to take you out to the breaks as well as snorkelling, village visits and hiking.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Vanua Levu

    Grand Eastern Hotel

    This is the plushest hotel in Labasa. There’s an airy, somewhat colonial atmosphere and the staff is helpful. Standard rooms have porches facing the river, but it’s worth paying the extra for the deluxe rooms that open out onto the courtyard swimming pool. All rooms are clean but slightly careworn. There’s also a decent restaurant and bar.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Vanua Levu

    Namena Island Resort

    This small dive and snorkel retreat is outrageously located on Namenalala Island in the paradisaical Namena Marine Reserve. Namena was badly damaged in 2016's Cyclone Winston, and was closed at the time of research. Contact the resort for updates.

  • Lodging in Savusavu & Around

    Jean-Michel Cousteau Fiji Islands Resort

    This outstanding luxury eco-resort was started by the son of Jacques Cousteau. Unsurprisingly, it attracts divers, but families love it too: the kids club is exceptional, and practically a mini-resort unto itself, with a pool, flying fox, cooking classroom, play areas galore and a nanny-per-child for everyone under five. The beautiful bures are massive and feature handmade furnishings, large decks and private garden areas. Fabulous gourmet meals are included in the price, as are all activities except diving: they'll even ferry you over to the exclusive Naviavia Island for private picnics. Though very family-centric, the resort has dedicated 'serenity zones' for adults only. Its dive shop is one of the best in Fiji; there's also a full-time marine biologist on site.

  • Lodging in Savusavu & Around

    Koro Sun Resort

    This refurbished resort welcomes families and romantics by the drove; with 64 beautifully landscaped hectares, there's room for them all. There are 51 bures and villas in varying sizes, shapes and locations sprinkled across the grounds, the most exciting of which are the new adults-only Edgewater bures floating above a gorgeous lagoon. From here, kayak out to the magnificent grotto at nearby Bat Island. Food, kids club and nannies are included in the price, as is use of tennis courts, a nine-hole golf course, kayaks, bikes and snorkelling gear. Diving is with Namena Divers.

  • Lodging in Taveuni

    Sau Bay Fiji Retreat

    This gorgeous, private place is in a sheltered bay on Vanua Levu (best accessed from Taveuni; contact them in advance for transfers) and offers easy access to exceptional diving spots, including the famous Great White Wall. There are four light wooden cottages (one with two bedrooms) with private decks and outdoor showers, and a highly covetable luxury safari 'glamping' tent. There’s no actual beach, but there is excellent hiking (it's surrounded by rainforest), good snorkelling at the house reef and you can take the kayaks to paddle in the mangroves up a small river. Food is fresh and local; compulsory meal plans $127.

  • Lodging in Taveuni

    Taveuni Dive Resort

    If you're a diver, this spanking new resort may well prove impossible to beat. Built by the well-respected Taveuni Dive outfit, it's the closest digs on Taveuni to Rainbow Reef: from bure to bubbling takes just 15 minutes. There are eight luxury bures available, but don't be fooled by the opulence: this is an ecoresort, running on solar power and constructed out of sustainable materials. Its super-sociable Salty Fox Bar & Grill (mains $14-40; 7am-10pm) is proving popular with guests and visitors, who congregate over burgers and beers to swap diving notes and tall tales.

  • Lodging in Vanua Levu

    Palmlea Farms Resort

    This remote-feeling resort makes for a gorgeous getaway. Overlooking the Great Sea Reef, simple bures with verandahs sit on a gentle green slope a short walk from the resort’s jetty – from here you can kayak to a private white-sand beach or enjoy fantastic snorkelling. Organic fruit and veg is grown on-site and every effort is made to manage the resort in an ecofriendly fashion. Other activities include hiking, diving ($250 two-tank dive), fishing and crabbing with a local guide. It's a 20-minute drive from Labasa; there are also frequent buses passing daily, making it easy to get to Savusavu.

  • Lodging in Taveuni

    Paradise Taveuni

    Set on a former plantation, this aptly named oceanfront place has stunning sunset views and plenty of hammocks and loungers from which to enjoy them. The bures and vales (rooms) are luxury all the way; all have outdoor Jacuzzis and rock showers, while bures and larger vales boast large private sundecks, some with locally handmade day beds. There’s incredible snorkelling right off the shore on the house reef, although there’s not much of a beach. Activities include fishing, diving, guided walks and cave trips; there’s also a spa overlooking the water.

  • Lodging in Savusavu & Around

    La Dolce Vita Holiday Villas

    This sweet place blends Italian touches – from the superb food right down to the Botticelli replica on one of the bure 's ceilings – with Fiji-style hospitality and architecture: as incongruous as it sounds, it's a winning combination. The five round bures are stylish – certamente! – and have exceptional sea views; there's even a thatched-roof pizza oven. If the six-hole golf course isn't your thing, there’s a bocce court, paddleboating, bushwalking, snorkelling and dolphins to watch in Natewa Bay. The resort runs on 24-hour solar power.

  • Lodging in Savusavu & Around

    Naveria Heights Lodge

    This boutique B&B can be as active or as chilled as you want it to be: choose between yoga classes, river tubing, mountain biking, snorkelling, hiking or doing sweet nothing at all. It can also organise diving trips. Perched on a jungly hill, the lodge's three elegant, polished-wood rooms have stunning bay views and open up to a fabulous sun deck. Meals are prepared to order; owner Sharon is a nutritionist and can tailor a menu for you. The B&B is a steep, 15-minute hike up the hill; otherwise, it does free pick-ups from Savusavu airport and the ferry terminal.

  • Lodging in Savusavu & Around

    Savasi Island

    This is the place to come for seclusion, scenery and getting spoiled senseless. The seven gorgeous villas all have incredible sea views, cloistered gardens and decks and impeccably designed interiors; most have their own pool. Gourmet meals are served in the tasteful restaurant or, in keeping with the privacy theme, on a deserted stretch of sand (or in a beach cave!). The excellent KoroSun Dive is based here. Savasi Island is connected to Vanua Levu by a causeway: it's about 10-minutes' drive from Savusavu.

  • Lodging in Taveuni

    Taveuni Palms

    Breathtakingly beautiful and very private, Taveuni Palms boasts three villas, each with its own beach, pool and seven-strong staff, including a personal chef and nanny. The cook will prepare a five-course meal for you every night, but the villas also have kitchens. All have huge decks, ridiculous views and incredible entertainment centres with big TVs, DVD players and loaded iPods. Activities include kayaking, diving, snorkelling and cooking lessons. All fruit and veggies are organically grown on the sprawling, manicured property.

  • Lodging in Taveuni

    Nadilo Bay Resort

    This surf resort bills itself as sustainable, and it really does walk the walk. Power is via water turbine, all fruits and veggies are from its garden, and local fishermen provide their daily catches for the menu. Bures are super-traditional, and cut from the island's rainforest: they have not only thatched roofs, but the walls are thatched as well. The bay has top-notch right- and left-hand surf breaks; the resort rents long and short boards. Kids are welcome and are encouraged to play with local village children.

  • Lodging in Savusavu & Around

    Daku Resort

    A resort-cum-self-improvement centre, Daku offers a diverse array of courses from gospel singing and watercolour painting to meditation and yoga. If doing nothing makes your chakras sing, flop down by the inviting pool or book a massage. Accommodation is in neat bures, villas with plunge pools, or private three- or four-bedroom houses (from $365) that are ideal for groups. All have wonderful views. The beach across the road is pebble rather than sand, but there's good snorkelling and kayaking to be had.