Lonely Planet Writer

The undercover Malmö artist unveils another 'mouseterpiece'

Residents in Malmö, Sweden, have been flocking to see the latest miniature installation by mysterious artists AnonyMouse.

A tiny installation in Malmo. Image by AnonyMouse

Its creators captured the imagination of people around the world when mouse-sized eateries such as Il Topolino (an Italian restaurant) and Noix de Vie (a cafe) popped up at ankle-height on a busy street in the city of Malmö in late 2016. And, just before Christmas 2017, two new attractions appeared in the city, this time taking the form of a miniature bookshop and theatre.

Frankie and Benjys Bocker, Malmo. Image by AnonyMouse

As with the previous installations, the tiny facades present intricately detailed scenes. Frankie & Benjys Böcker displays an array of tiny books stacked in the window, while a ladder is propped up against shelves filled with books for the discerning rodent inside.

Teatro Reggiano. Image by AnonyMouse

Meanwhile, visitors can also take a glimpse into the sumptuous interior of Teatro Reggiano, where a decadent chandelier hands above the audience’s seats, and the theatre’s stage, draped with velvet curtains, is ready for the next performance. Upon unveiling their latest work on Instagram in December, AnonyMouse invited fans of their work to check it out, saying, “come snuggle up with us with a good book at frankie and benjys, and later on we’ve got tickets to tonight’s show at teatro reggiano!”

The garage in Borås, western Sweden. Image by AnonyMouse

As well as the scenes in Malmö, AnonyMouse took their miniature magic to Borås in western Sweden last year, ensuring that the city’s rodent community were catered for with a textiles store, a garage and a shop selling what could be the world’s smallest antiques.

The installations are there to bring joy to people. Image by AnonyMouse

The artists have amassed quite a following on social media since Noix de Vie opened its tiny doors to the mouse population, but, despite their continuing fame, the creators of the diminutive establishments have remained tight-lipped about their identities. Speaking to themetro.co.uk last year, a spokesperson said, “for us the main point with the little scenes are to spread a bit of joy, so the question of our identities seems quite irrelevant.”