Best hotels and hostels in Mid-Wales

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Powys

    Living Room Treehouses

    Wonderfully designed, these six cosy, rustic-glam tree houses blend organically into an enchanted forest off the A470. You're as close to nature as can be (up a tree!), yet the beds are luxurious, insulation and wood-burning stoves keep you warm all year, and the seclusion is glorious (all houses are set generously apart). Arrival days are Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. There's an organic farm shop on site, woodlands and pasture to roam (the latter nibbled by a rare herd of Celtic Soay sheep), and star-gazing platforms and outdoor hot tubs for fresh air. It may sound hackneyed, but these electricity-free tree houses really do make for perfect romantic getaways (as long as your sweetie loves the great outdoors). A favourite is Gwdy Hw (pronounced 'goody-hoo'), but Bryn Meurig, lower to the ground, is the best choice for families. The next project for Living Room is a 'tree hotel'.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Ceredigion

    Harbour Master

    Standing proudly at Aberaeron's harbour entrance, this boutique hotel offers food and accommodation worthy of any chic city bolthole. The striking, violet-painted Georgian buildings hold 13 singularly decorated rooms featuring Frette linens, vintage Welsh blankets, bold colour schemes and high-tech bathrooms. Those in the newly restored grain warehouse have the same contemporary styling, with excellent harbour views. Downstairs, Harbour Master's renowned restaurant does delightful things with local ingredients such as lobster and crab, and Welsh beef, lamb and cheeses (two-/three-course dinner £28/35). The lively bar offers the same outstanding cooking in a more casual setting (mains £14 to £15). Check the website for dinner-and-room packages and be aware that two-night minimums sometimes apply.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Ceredigion

    Gwesty Cymru

    A real gem, the 'Wales Hotel' is a charismatic boutique property right on the waterfront with a strong sense of Welsh identity. Local slate features throughout, paired with rich aubergine carpets and contemporary styling. Of the eight en-suite rooms, four have sea views, and rooms 4 and 6 have baths. The hotel's small restaurant (mains £16 to £19) has a strong reputation based on good local produce and classical cooking. Meat-lovers should try the succulent Welsh lamb rump with leeks and crushed new potatoes. Book ahead.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Powys

    Beudy Banc

    Set on a working sheep farm nestled in the folds of the Dyfi Valley, this wonderful place offers cosy cabins in grassy meadows with glorious views. There's a fire pit and a walking trail across the farm that links up with Glyndŵr's Way, but the real joy here is in the two excellent mountain-bike descents and the network of tracks and bridleways. Beudy Banc is about 3 miles northeast of Machynlleth off the A489; look for the small turn-off signed simply 'Banc'.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Powys

    Glandyfi Castle

    Built in 1820 as a gift from a slave-owning Caribbean planter to his wife, this quirky Regency Gothic castle has been brought back to life as a luxury B&B. Three rooms blend classical styling with modern sensibilities, while the turrets, towers and superb views over the 18-hectare garden to the Dyfi estuary make it an incredibly special place to stay. The castle is 6 miles southwest of Machynlleth, off the A487.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Powys

    Ynyshir Hall

    Tucked away to the south of the River Dovey (Afon Dyfi) estuary, just off the main Aberystwyth–Machynlleth road (A487), 6 miles southwest of Machynlleth, this grand manor house was once kept as a hunting lodge by Queen Victoria. It's now a quietly opulent boutique hotel and restaurant, where the friendly staff are never less than professional.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Powys

    Old Vicarage

    This three-room, gay-friendly boutique B&B features Victorian fittings, making you feel like you've wandered onto the set of a period drama. Opulent, rich colours dominate and the peace of your sojourn is only interrupted by the chiming of antique clocks. Sumptuous three-course dinners (£34.95) need to be booked in advance. Norton is 1.5 miles north of Presteigne on the B4355.

  • Lodging in Powys

    Lasswade Country House

    This excellent country restaurant-with-rooms makes great use of a handsome, three-storey Edwardian house looking over the Irfon Valley towards the Brecon Beacons. Committed to green tourism (it's won a slew of awards, sources hydroelectric power and even offers electric-vehicle recharging), it's also big on gastronomy: the chef-owner's three-course menu (£34) features Cambrian lamb, Tally goat's cheese and other delights. The restaurant is open to non-guests (7.30pm to 9.30pm Monday to Saturday); reservations are required.

  • Lodging in Ceredigion

    Gwbert Hotel

    With unspoilt views from the cliff-lined inlet through which the Teifi flows into Cardigan Bay, and 21 exceedingly comfortable, understated en-suite rooms, the Gwbert is one of Cardigan's most appealing sleeps. Add hearty breakfasts, amazing walking at your doorstep, and the Flat Rock bistro, which elevates pub and bistro classics (mains £12 to £15), and you have a wonderful package. The Gwbert also runs five self-catering cottages in the area.

  • Lodging in Powys

    Caer Beris Manor

    Once home to Lord Swansea, this 1896 mock-Tudor country manor lies at the end of a long driveway, winding through 11 hectares of parkland on the River Irfon. Classic styling, log fires and spacious rooms with swag curtains, heavy fabrics and tassled lamps await. The oak-panelled Restaurant 1896 serves a fine seasonal menu featuring local produce (mains £19 to £25). The hotel is on the west side of Builth Wells, on the A483.

  • Lodging in Powys

    Ardwyn House

    The young owners have restored the Arts-and-Crafts grandeur of this once-derelict house. There are rural views, parquet flooring and period wallpaper and furnishings throughout, and claw-foot baths in two of the three rooms. There's also an oak-panelled guest lounge with a pool table and bar, and afternoon tea on arrival. Two self-catering cottages (£495 per week) are also available.

  • Lodging in Powys

    The Cottage

    A really top-notch B&B making great use of a large, Arts and Crafts–style Edwardian house, the Cottage has a flower-adorned garden, and comfortable rooms decorated in period style with heavy wooden furniture and lots of original features. All rooms are either en suite or have private bathrooms and the only TV is in the guest lounge.

  • Lodging in Ceredigion

    3 Pen Cei

    Affable owners John and Lesley have refurbished this grand Georgian shipping office beautifully, with crisp linens, bold colour schemes and fresh flowers in rooms all named for major local rivers. The larger ones have super-king beds (one also has a free-standing bath), and the hosts are supremely helpful and welcoming.

  • Lodging in Powys

    Eco Retreats

    Eco Retreats offers superchilled accommodation in beautifully furnished tepees and yurts. It's a low-tech experience, with wood burners, compost toilets and outdoor showers set in a remote location up a rough forest track. The tents are well spaced and the views are glorious, making it an incredibly tranquil place to unwind. Reiki, meditation, kinesiology and elemental medicine sessions are also available on site. It's tricky to find; the owners will give you directions to the campground when you make your booking.

  • Lodging in Powys

    Long Mountain

    Evelyn and Mike, your relaxed hosts, run this purpose-built B&B located 2 miles from Welshpool. A modern extension to a 400-year-old timber-frame house, it has three guest rooms with top-quality fittings, solid oak furniture, king-size beds with Egyptian-cotton linen, and marble bathrooms. Offa's Dyke Path runs almost past the guesthouse, and there are wonderful views. No children under 16. To get here, head east on the B4381, turning left onto the B4388 and then right onto Hope Rd.

  • Lodging in Powys

    Metropole Hotel

    This grand, turreted, late-Victorian hotel has spacious, corporate-style rooms and an excellent leisure complex with a swimming pool, sauna and gym. The Rock Spa offers a full range of treatments (£65 for a one-hour hot-stone massage) and there are two restaurants: Spencer's Bar & Brasserie for light bistro fare and the swankier Radnor & Miles Restaurant (menus £25).

  • Lodging in Powys

    Wynnstay Wales

    This erstwhile Georgian coaching inn (1780) remains the best all-rounder in town, with 22 charming older-style rooms, one with a four-poster bed, and creaky, uneven floors. Downstairs there's a good restaurant, a wine shop with Italian single-estate varietals on tap and, in the courtyard on Friday and Saturday nights between Easter and October, a wood-fired pizzeria (pizzas £10).

  • Lodging in Powys

    Old Vicarage Dolfor

    A handsome rural Victorian house, the Old Vicarage offers pretty rooms with muted colour schemes, subtle floral wallpapers, claw-foot bath-tubs and an incredibly warm welcome. If you book, you can also dine here: the accomplished two-course dinner menu (£25) features plenty of local produce. The Old Vicarage is 4 miles south of Newtown by the busy A483.

  • Lodging in Powys

    Offa Dyke House

    Reached through a passageway from High St, this B&B consists of three sumptuous rooms, all decorated with great attention to detail and with the comfort of hikers in mind. Offa Dyke Room and Glyndŵr Room feature views of the eponymous trails, baths in two of the rooms soothe aching bodies, and guests' needs are anticipated with cheerful efficiency.

  • Lodging in Powys

    Elephant & Castle Hotel

    Occupying a sweet, central spot by the Severn, this refurbished stone pub offers five en-suite rooms with king-size beds in the hotel proper (will it be the 'Robert Owen' or the 'Laura Ashley'?) and another 10 in the bothy (hut) out back. There's also the in-house Riverside Restaurant, making a good fist of a standard pub menu (mains £12 to £14).