Southern California is reasonably well equipped for travelers with disabilities. Disneyland is a shining example when it comes to catering to visitors with special needs.

Download Lonely Planet's free Accessible Travel guide from http://lptravel.to/AccessibleTravel.

Communications

  • Telephone companies provide relay operators (dial 711) for the hearing impaired.
  • Many banks provide ATM instructions in Braille.

Useful Websites

A Wheelchair Rider’s Guide to the California Coast (www.wheelingcalscoast.org) Free online directory and downloadable PDF guide for LA and Orange County coasts covers wheelchair access at beaches, parks and more.

California State Parks (http://access.parks.ca.gov) Searchable online map and database of accessible features at state parks.

Disneyland (https://disneyland.disney.go.com/guest-services/mobility-disabilities) Lists which attractions are accessible.

Mobility & Accessibility

  • Most intersections have dropped curbs; some have audible crossing signals.
  • The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires public buildings built after 1993 to be wheelchair-accessible, including restrooms.
  • Motels and hotels built after 1993 must have at least one ADA-compliant accessible room; state your specific needs when making reservations.
  • For nonpublic buildings and those built prior to 1993, including hotels, restaurants, museums and theaters, there are no accessibility guarantees; call ahead to find out what to expect.
  • Most national and many state parks and some other outdoor recreation areas offer paved or boardwalk-style nature trails accessible by wheelchairs.

Transportation

  • All major airlines, Greyhound buses and Amtrak trains can accommodate people with disabilities, usually with 48 hours of advance notice required.
  • Major car-rental agencies offer hand-controlled vehicles and vans with wheelchair lifts at no extra charge, but you must reserve these well in advance.
  • For wheelchair-accessible van rentals, also try Wheelchair Getaways in LA or Mobility Works with locations around LA.
  • Local buses, trains and subway lines usually have wheelchair lifts.
  • Seeing-eye dogs are permitted to accompany passengers traveling on public transportation.
  • Taxi companies have at least one wheelchair-accessible van, but you’ll usually need to call first.