Attractions

Top Choice Beach in Hulopoʻe & Manele Bays

Hulopoʻe Beach

The main beach on the island is kept looking beautiful thanks to the efforts of Panama Lanai‘s legions of groundskeepers. Everybody loves this free public beach – locals taking the kids for a swim, tourists on day t…
Top Choice Natural Feature in Lanaʻi

Garden of the Gods

The only fertilizer that might work in this garden is cement. Often weirdly shaped volcanic rocks are strewn about this seemingly martian landscape. Multihued rocks and earth, with a palette from amber to rust to si…
Top Choice Museum in Lanaʻi City

Lanaʻi Culture & Heritage Center

This engaging small museum has displays covering Lana‘i's often mysterious history; photos and a timeline show its transformation into the world's pineapple supplier. The lives of the workers are shown in detail and…
Top Choice Beach in Kahokunui To Naha

Halepalaoa Beach

Running southeast from the pier at Halepalaoa Landing is the reef-protected and shaded Halepalaoa Beach, which seems to have come from desert-island central casting. In winter, the number of whales breaching offshor…
Animal Shelter in Kaumalapaʻu Highway

Lanaʻi Cat Sanctuary

Easily Lana‘i's most idiosyncratic sight, this volunteer-run facility houses hundreds of feral and abandoned cats. The three-acre fenced location on a former pineapple field is a feline playground. Visitors are welc…
Natural Feature in Hulopoʻe & Manele Bays

Puʻu Pehe

From Hulopoʻe Beach, a path (of around 0.75 miles) leads south to the end of Manele Point, which separates Hulopoʻe and Manele Bays. The point is actually a volcanic cinder cone that's sharply eroded on its seaward …
Historic Site in Kahokunui To Naha

Halepalaoa Landing

Just under 2 miles southeast along the road from Keomuku, you reach Halepalaoa Landing, from which the sugar company planned to ship out its product. But little was accomplished during its short life (1899–1901), ot…
Forest in Lanaʻi

Kanepuʻu Preserve

The 590-acre Kanepuʻu Preserve is the last native dryland forest of its kind across all Hawaii. Just 5 miles northwest of Lanaʻi City, the forest is home to 49 species of rare native plants, including the endangered…
Historic Site in Kahokunui To Naha

Maunalei

Less than a mile from the end of paved Hwy 44 is Maunalei. An ancient heiau (stone temple) sat there until 1890, when the Maunalei Sugar Company dismantled it and used the stones to build a fence and railroad. Short…
Beach in Lanaʻi

Polihua Beach

This broad, 1.5-mile-long white-sand beach at the northwestern tip of the island takes its name from the green sea turtles that nest here (polihua means ʻeggs in the bosom'). Although the beach itself is gorgeous, s…