Best hotels and hostels in Western Ukraine

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Lviv

    Vintage

    Lviv’s first real boutique hotel is a delightfully intimate 29-room place, accessed through an inconspicuous entrance in the historical centre. Rooms ooze period style with hardwood floors, polished antique-style furniture and Victorian-style wallpaper, successfully blended with flat-screen TVs and 21st-century bathrooms. You’ll be looking forward all night to the breakfast, cooked to order and served in the hotel’s stylish restaurant. The genuinely friendly staff are glad to help with anything Lviv-related, plus onward travel arrangements and the like.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Lviv

    Leopolis Hotel

    One of the historical centre’s finest places to catch some Zs. Every guest room in this 18th-century edifice is different, but all have a well-stocked minibar, elegant furniture and an Italian-marble bathroom with underfloor heating. Wheelchair-friendly facilities, a new spa/fitness area in the cellars and a pretty decent brasserie are extras you won’t find anywhere else. The Leopolis comes to you from the same designer who fashioned Tallinn’s Telegraaf hotel.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Lviv

    Astoria

    A hotel since 1914, the Astoria was given a stylishly moody retrofit in 2013, sending it back to the monochrome world of the 1930s. The seven floors are all marble and cast iron, weighty lacquered doors and hangar-style lighting. Rooms are art-deco studies in black, white and every shade in between. Breakfast is served in the superb restaurant. The rooftop apartments have their own kitchens.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Lviv

    Old City Hostel

    Occupying two floors of an elegantly fading tenement just steps from pl Rynok, this expertly run hostel, with period features and views of the Shevchenko statue from the wrap-around balcony, has long established itself as the city's best. Fluff-free dorms hold four to eight beds, shower queues are unheard of, sturdy lockers keep your stuff safe and there's a well-equipped kitchen.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Lviv

    Villa Stanislavsky

    This hilltop villa stands amid the splendid decay of what used to be a posh fin de siècle residential neighbourhood, 20 minutes on foot from the centre. The dark, polished wood of the stairs and furniture and the placid surroundings provide much-needed respite from the old town's hustle and bustle. A dedicated chess room is the cherry on the sundae.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Lviv

    Saban Deluxe

    This superb guesthouse 3km north of pl Rynok is an eclectic mix of old and new, 21st century and antique, jumble sale and IKEA all rolled into one. All rooms are completely different, the owner is particularly helpful and the location isn't as inconvenient as it may seem (buses run from nearby). Full board available.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Lviv

    Eney

    Conveniently located near the Lychakivsky Cemetery, this well-appointed, luxurious-feeling hotel has an impeccable reputation for service and maintenance. Rooms are imaginatively designed with big-print wallpapers, lots of cushions and crisp bathrooms and the outdoor heated pool is the cherry on the cake.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Hotel George

    Partially renovated and still sporting lots of faded yesteryear chic, this epicentral hotel remains a travellers' favourite. A prime candidate for a showstopping five-star establishment, this gorgeous 1901 art nouveau gem has instead a mix of rooms, from threadbare bathroom-less tourist class to fairly luxurious suites. High-ceilinged period style and creaky parquet floors exist throughout though some have been victims of crass remont. However, communal spaces remain grandly untouched, the English-speaking staff are great and the buffet breakfast is still served in the amazing Oriental-style restaurant.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    NTON

    Near the terminus of tram 7 in Lviv's western suburbs, this far-flung hotel on the road out to the Polish border may not seem too promising, but it is possibly Lviv's best deal. Rooms are fully removated, spacious and well furnished, and contain little extras like kettles, sewing kits and hairdryers. An entire Hello! magazine of homegrown celebs has stayed here (Ani Lorak, VIA Gra, Valery Meladze), their signed portraits lining the corridors. The breakfast is a bit 'wedding banquet' but there's enough of a choice to satisfy most tastes.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Ekotel

    There are no frills but plenty of smiles at this spartan but comfortable 94-bed budget hotel and hostel, 2km southwest of the city centre.To keep rates down, rooms do the absolute minimum but are clean and well maintained, though the call-centre furniture could get a touch depressing after a couple of days. The dorms have no bunks, there's a small common room and breakfast is 35uah extra.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Panorama Hotel

    The Panorama has been a hotel since 1875 though it operated under a variety of names. Today the 51 vista-rich rooms are studies in crisp, 3rd-millennium style with bold fabrics contrasting with sepia and beige fittings. It's one of the few hotels that caters to both business clients and families; there's a gym, beauty salon and excursion bureau in the building.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Reikartz Dworzec

    Dworzec in Polish means 'station' and it's on the way to Lviv's train terminus that you'll find another link in the Reikartz chain. Rooms are business standard, fitted out in unoffensive tones and with fully functional wi-fi and aircon. The location is good for the station and the old centre is only a short tram ride away.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Dream Hostel

    The Lviv branch of this national hostel chain sports spotless dorms with pine bunks equipped with reading lights and privacy-creating curtains. There's also a spacious lounge, a cafe and staff on hand to patiently answer all those questions they've answered a thousand times before. The location on busy Krakivska is perfect.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Reikartz Medievale

    The Lviv link in this 100% Ukrainian chain limits the medieval theme to a few spired bedsteads, the odd tapestry and a bit of chunky furniture. There's also nothing of the Middle Ages about the huge bathrooms, crisp linens and exceptional service. More hryvnya get you a bigger room, but little else.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Eurohotel

    This unexciting place is a good example of just what you can do with a surplus Soviet lumpen-hotel. The 90 bog-standard but comfortable rooms are for those who want to sleep, shower and access the web, but little else. There's a fairly decent restaurant on the premises.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Rius Hotel

    Modern hotel on the 6th and 7th floors of a mini high-rise aimed at business clientele, just a few minutes walk from pl Rynok. Bedrooms are done out in shades of unchallenging beige and brown and facilities include a fitness centre, a restaurant and a multipurpose conference hall.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Hotel 39

    If you want good quality digs bang in the heart of the action, look no further than this superbly done-out hotel housed in the Palace Coloccini right on the Rynok. Rooms are a little cramped but furnished in reproduction antiques, and bathrooms are of the most recent vintage.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Nataliya-18

    Located on the edge of the former Armenian quarter, this solid midrange choice features big bathrooms containing Ukraine' s softest, fluffiest towels. The 22 odd-shaped rooms are anchored by queen-sized beds draped in fine linens. The breakfast is cooked to order.

  • Lodging in Lviv

    Hotel Lviv

    This 1965 ugly duckling was transformed into a, well, slightly less unattractive duck in anticipation of free-spending football fans, sending standards and prices higher. Most rooms have been updated but a whiff of Soviet hotel decor still survives here and there.