Top Choice Street in Odesa

Bul Prymorsky

Sooner or later everyone gravitates to this tree-lined pedestrian zone with replica 19th-century gas lamps, park benches and more photographers armed with a small zoo of animals with which to have your photo taken. …
Top Choice Theatre in Odesa

Odesa Opera & Ballet Theatre

The jewel in Odesa's architectural crown was designed in the 1880s by the architects who also designed the famous Vienna State Opera, namely Ferdinand Fellner and Herman Helmer. After being closed for several years …
Top Choice Landmark in Odesa

Potemkin Steps

A woman yells at a tidy line of soldiers as they take aim. An officer commands: 'Fire!'. It takes many painful seconds for her to collapse and release a pram with a baby inside, which starts slowly tumbling down the…
Top Choice Historic Site in Odesa

Vul Derybasivska

Odesa's main commercial street, pedestrian vul Derybasivska, is jam-packed with restaurants, bars and, in the summer high season, tourists. At its quieter eastern end you'll discover the statue of José de Ribas. Thi…
Museum in Odesa

Archaeology Museum

Gold jewellery and coins from early Black Sea civilisations are joined by a few Egyptian mummies at this under-visited museum.
Gallery in Odesa

Museum of Western & Eastern Art

A beautifully renovated mid-19th-century palace houses a collection that's both rich and eclectic – apt for a cosmopolitan port city like Odesa. Classical Italian and Dutch art comes together with Asian treasures fr…
Museum in Odesa

Pushkin Museum

This is where Alexander Pushkin spent his first days in Odesa, after being exiled from Moscow by the tsar in 1823 for mischievous epigrams. Governor Vorontsov subsequently humiliated the writer with petty administra…
Museum in Odesa

Odessa Fine Arts Museum

Located in the former palace of one Count Pototsky, this museum has an impressive collection of Russian and Ukrainian art, including a few seascapes by master talent Ayvazovsky and some Soviet realist paintings.
Museum in Odesa

History of Odesa Jews Museum

Less than 2% of people call themselves Jewish in today's Odesa – against 44% in the early 1920s – but the resilient and humorous Jewish spirit still permeates every aspect of local life. Hidden inside a typical rund…
Beach in Odesa

Route of Health

The dystopian Soviet name has stuck to this 5.5km stretch of sandy, rocky and concrete beaches that form the city's recreational belt. Packed like a sardine can, and filled with noise and barbecue smells, the beache…