Attractions

Top Choice Ruins in Mérida

Teatro Romano

Mérida's most spectacular Roman monument, and the only one to once again fulfil its original function – by hosting performances during the Festival Internacional de Teatro Clásico in summer – the Teatro Romano is th…
Top Choice Bridge in Mérida

Puente Romano

Don't miss the extraordinarily powerful spectacle of the Puente Romano spanning the Río Guadiana. At 792m in length with 60 granite arches, it's one of the longest bridges built by the Romans. It was constructed in …
Top Choice Museum in Mérida

Museo Nacional de Arte Romano

Even if you visit only a handful of Mérida's sights, make sure one of them is this fabulous museum, which has a superb three-floor collection of statues, busts, mosaics, frescoes, coins, pottery and other Roman arte…
Top Choice Fortress in Mérida

Alcazaba

This large Islamic fort was built in the mid-9th century on a site already occupied by the Romans and Visigoths, probably becoming the first ever alcazaba in Al-Andalus. In the middle of the sprawling complex, its p…
Ruins in Mérida

Casa del Mitreo

Beside Mérida's Plaza de Toros, the Casa del Mitreo is a late-1st- or 2nd-century Roman house with a well-preserved fresco and several intricate mosaics. Among the mosaics you'll find the partial but beautiful remai…
Ruins in Mérida

Circo Romano

The 1st-century Circo Romano could accommodate 30,000 spectators. Discovered in the 16th century, its remains represent the only surviving hippodrome of its kind in Spain. In the attached interpretive centre you can…
Ruins in Mérida

Templo de Diana

Inaccurately named, for it's now known to have been dedicated to the Imperial cult, this 1st-century-BC temple stood in the municipal forum, where the city government was based. Parts of the temple were later incorp…
Ruin in Mérida

Cripta de Santa Eulalia

This basilica was built in the 5th century in honour of Mérida's pat­ron saint, who is said to have been martyred in the 4th century. It was then reconstructed in the 13th century. The modern-day church is closed to…
Ruins in Mérida

Anfiteatro

Attached to the grand Teatro Romano, the (slightly less dazzling) Anfiteatro opened in 8 BC for gladiatorial contests and held 14,000; the gladiator-versus-lion fresco in the Museo Nacional de Arte Romano was taken …
Ruins in Mérida

Arco de Trajano

This imposing 15m-high granite archway isn't known to have anything to do with Roman emperor Trajan, but it was situated on one of Mérida's main Roman streets and, in its original marble-covered form, may have serve…