Slovakia lags behind many EU states in accommodation for people with disabilities. The Slovak Union for the Disabled (www.sztp.sk) is working to change the status quo.

  • Hotels and restaurants have few ramps or barrier-free rooms. Large chain hotels are the best bet for accessible rooms; there are options in Bratislava and spa town Piešťany.
  • Central Bratislava is navigable by wheelchair, though pavements are far from universally smooth. It's best to have a companion for steep-access sights like the castle. There's some accessibility on public transport, including buses that lower, and special seating.
  • There are some wheelchair-accessible trails in the High and Low Tatras, and several museums featuring Braille or location-sensitive audio guides; find details on http://slovakia.travel/en/disabled-access-travel-in-slovakia.
  • Outdoors enthusiasts with mobility issues should consult www.high-tatras.travel/information/summer/routes-for-the-disabled. Eight marked hiking trails are suitable for some travellers with reduced mobility.

Accessible Travel Online Resources

Download Lonely Planet's free Accessible Travel guide from http://lptravel.to/AccessibleTravel.