Hygiene in Singapore is strictly observed and the tap water is safe to drink. However, hepatitis A does occasionally occur. You only need vaccinations if you come from a yellow-fever area. Singapore is not a malarial zone, though dengue fever is an increasing concern and there have been a few cases of Zika reported.

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Before You Go

Health Insurance

Travel insurance is a must for any traveller heading overseas. Singapore’s medical system is world-class – however, it does not come cheap so make sure the medical component of your insurance provides high coverage.

Recommended Vaccinations

You only need vaccinations if you come from a yellow-fever area. Singapore is not a malarial zone, though dengue fever is an increasing concern.

In Singapore

Dengue Fever

Singapore has suffered a sharp rise in cases of this nasty mosquito-borne disease in recent years. Peak biting periods are dawn and dusk, though it's best to use insect-avoidance measures at all times. Symptoms include high fever, severe headache and body ache. Some people develop a rash and diarrhoea. There is no specific treatment – just rest and paracetamol. Do not take aspirin. See a doctor to be diagnosed and monitored. For more information, visit www.nea.gov.sg/dengue-zika.

Prickly Heat

This is an itchy rash caused by excessive perspiration trapped under the skin. It usually strikes people who have just arrived in a hot climate. Keep cool, bathe often, dry the skin and use a mild talcum or prickly heat powder, or resort to air conditioning.

Tap Water

The tap water in Singapore is safe to drink.

Zika

The first case of Zika virus was recorded in Singapore in 2016 and for a few weeks afterwards, shops sold out of mosquito repellent throughout Singapore. After the initial outbreak, the number of confirmed cases diminished steadily. Check www.nea.gov.sg/dengue-zika for up-to-date information. Symptoms can be similar to those caused by the flu, and may include fever, skin rash, joint and muscle pain, headache, red eyes and lack of energy. See a doctor for diagnosis.

Medical Services

Singapore's medical institutions are first-rate and generally cheaper than private healthcare in the West. But needless to say, travel insurance is advisable. Check with insurance providers as to which treatments and procedures are covered before you leave home.

Medical Services

Medical Centres Changi Airport has medical centres in Terminals 1, 2 and 3.

Raffles Hospital Located close to Bugis MRT station.

Raffles Medical Clinic A walk-in clinic at Raffles Hospital.

Clinics

Your hotel or hostel should be able to direct you to a local GP: there are plenty around.

International Medical Clinic Specialising in family and travel medicine.

International Medical Clinic International standard medical care.

Raffles Medical Clinic A walk-in clinic at Raffles Hospital.

Singapore General Hospital Also has an emergency room.

Emergency Rooms