Dangers & Annoyances

  • Always take a cab after dark between the lake and the Centro Turístico.
  • Avoid cycling to Peninsula de Asese due to occasional robberies.

Political Unrest

The anti-government protests that erupted in mid-April 2018 have not spared Granada. In early June, the city hall was set on fire and there have been violent clashes between government-funded Sandinista mobs and protesters. There has also been some looting of businesses.

Emergency & Important Numbers

Ambulance (Cruz Roja)2552-2711
Police2552-2929

LGBT Travellers

Granada's gay and lesbian scene is underground, though travelers can find a good list of gay-friendly hotels and businesses such as the popular Hotel Casa San Francisco, at www.purpleroofs.com.

Internet Access

The vast majority of accommodations, and many restaurants and cafes, have free wi-fi.

Money

Several banks are within a block of Parque Central.

BAC

BanPro

Western Union International money transfers.

Opening Hours

Opening hours vary throughout the year. Church opening hours can be erratic; they don't always keep to the schedules they post.

Banks 8:30am–4pm Monday to Friday, to noon Saturday

Restaurants noon–2:30pm and 7pm–11pm

Cafes 7am–6pm

Bars and Clubs 8pm–3am

Post

Post Office Opposite the ex–Cine Karawala, now the home of Taco Stop.

Telephone

Tourist Information

Check at hostels and tour operators for the latest tourist info.

Intur The Granada branch of the national tourist office has up-to-date transportation schedules, a reasonable city map, and lots of information and flyers.

Travel with Children

Granada’s a fairly kid-friendly city: wide footpaths, little traffic, a couple of pedestrian areas, a sizable Parque Central and a good number of highchair-equipped restaurants – some high-end hotels even have portable cribs. A couple of Granada’s must-dos are well suited to kids over the age of five – it would be a world-weary kid indeed who didn’t get a kick out of a tour of Las Isletas de Granada with a mixture of boat rides, swimming, monkeys and island lunches.

The old train station has a decent playground and an old steam engine out front. Older kids will enjoy the hiking trails through the cloudforest on Volcán Mombacho. Alternatively, take a Volcán Masaya night tour past glowing red lava before strapping on a helmet and headlamp and descending into a bat cave – the kids will love you forever.

Accessible Travel

Some tour outfitters and many hotels can accommodate travelers with disabilities, but because Granada's city streets are lined with bumpy cobblestones and old colonial houses, it's best to plan ahead.

Volunteering

Hotel Con Corazón Hotel with a heart is a good place to learn more about volunteer ops.