Lonely Planet Writer

Would you take a selfie in front of a new Hollywood sign?

For those visiting Los Angeles, one of the biggest draws to the city is getting that iconic shot with the gigantic white Hollywood sign in the background. But if you couldn’t get close enough, would you settle for a replica instead?

A new Hollywood sign is just one of the solutions that have been proposed by Los Angeles City Council in a bid to alleviate the congestion that droves of tourists bring as they make their way through the city. Released earlier this month, the report suggested building another sign on the opposite side of the same slope.

Hollywood Sign, Los Angeles, California
The iconic Hollywood sign is known across the world. Image by GettyImages/ DEA / W. BUSS

According to the report, stakeholders such as the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce and The Oaks Homeowners Association were supportive of “replicating the Hollywood Sign on the Burbank-facing hillside of Griffith Park and installing smaller signs at different locations. These signs would draw visitors to other locations and provide additional photo opportunities”.

Many of the best viewpoints of the famous landmark are in inaccessible locations with visitors often wandering into residential neighbourhoods in search of a good photo. Currently, there is not an up-close view available to visitors in front of the sign, which often leaves tourists disappointed.

Hollywoodland Sign
Circa 1935: the Hollywoodland sign. The ‘land’ part of the sign was removed in the 1940s. Image by Hulton Archive/Getty Images

“Not only is congestion a nuisance for the residents, but it also inhibits emergency vehicle access and reduces pedestrian safety” reads the report.

“The backdrop behind the [new] sign would still look similar to the original if it is located on the mountain. This would give the City the opportunity to promote the replica sign viewpoints as more accessible locations for photos than in the residential neighborhoods south of the Park.”

The report, however, noted that the downside of the strategy was that it “would take away from the history of the original Hollywood Sign and Hollywoodland”.

GettyImages-536128854
The replica of Paris’ Eiffel Tower sits in Las Vegas. Image by GettyImages/Tony Savino

Replicas of famous landmarks are not a new concept though with some of them like the Eiffel Tower in Las Vegas and the Statue of Liberty in Tokyo getting snapped in their hundreds by eager photographers.

It’s said that around 45 million tourists visit Los Angeles every year.