Lonely Planet Writer

An incredible light installation at Uluru has been extended for two more years

The glowing bulbs that make up the Field of Light Uluru will now remain at the famous Australian site until the end of 2020, giving travellers now opportunities to see the immersive art installation.

The Field of Light at Uluru will be extended until 2020. Image by Tourism Northern Territory

The award-winning exhibition was created by artist Bruce Munro and opened on 1 April, 2016 at Ayers Rock Resort. It surrounds the sacred site of Uluru, bringing more than 50,000 stems topped with illuminated glass spheres to an area that spans an area the size of more than nine football fields. The work of art is entirely illuminated by solar power and the spheres are connected with an illuminated optical fibre which lights up as darkness falls. Also entitled ‘Tili Wiru Tjuta Nyakutjaku’ or ‘looking at lots of beautiful lights’ in local Pitjantjatjara, it will now stay at the site until 31 December, 2020.

Field of Light, Uluru, Bruce Munro 2016. Image by: Mark Pickthall

“Since opening, more than 200,000 guests have been deeply moved by the Field of Light, it’s hard not to be. This further extension offers guests the opportunity to enjoy not only the spiritual nature of the destination, but experience it in a unique and mesmerising way,” said Ray Stone, an executive general manager at Voyages Indigenous Tourism Australia.

Multi-coloured light stems at the Field of Light, Uluru, Bruce Munro 2016. Photo by: Mark Pickthall

Uluru, the 3.6-kilometre long rock in the Australian outback, will no longer be open to tourists who want to climb starting on 26 October 2019. The decision was announced by Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park managers and the site’s traditional owners, the Anangu, who have always asked that people do not climb the sacred rock.