Lonely Planet Writer

See London's Tate Modern transformed into a brightly-coloured playground

A massive portion of the Tate Modern art museum in London has turned into a rainbow-coloured playground for adults, complete with swings large enough to seat three.

A woman looks up at a giant pendulum, part of a large-scale installation entitled, ‘One Two Three Swing!’ by Danish Collective Superflex, during a photocall for the Tate Modern’s latest commission for the Turbine Hall, at the Tate Modern in London on October 2, 2017. Image by ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images

The London art museum has unveiled an incredible interactive installation created by the Danish collective Superflex. The interconnected swing-set is located through the museum’s Turbine Hall, but also sprawls out of the museum doors, where more swings will be added as the installation grows.

Entitled One Two Three Swing! the exhibition invites people to work together to combat social apathy by swinging together. The artists before Superflex – Jakob Fenger, Bjørnstjerne Christiansen and Rasmus Nielsen – have conceived the piece to challenge “society’s apathy towards the political, environmental and economic crises of our age”.

A shadow is cast on the wall as a woman swings on a piece of art part of a large-scale installation entitled, ‘One Two Three Swing!’ by Danish Collective Superflex, during a photocall for the Tate Modern’s latest commission for the Turbine Hall. Image by ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images

There are three stages to the artwork – apathy, production and movement. Apathy is represented by a large pendulum suspended from the ceiling, which swings above a massive and bright carpet, inspired by the colours of British currency. The state of production is where visitors can find the area swing-seats are assembled and stored before use, then emerging into production, where they will find the interconnected three-seated swings.

A view of Superflex at the Tate Modern. Image by Hyundai Commission SUPERFLEX

The museum notes that the piece will continue to evolve and grow, with more swings added “spreading outside Tate Modern, into the urban landscape of London and potentially beyond into the wider world”. The artists’ want the work to explore “the potential of energy generated by social movements, drawing unexpected connections within, between, and beyond institutions, and proposing new uses for urban public space”.