Lonely Planet Writer

Watch as adorable seals perform underwater aquatics off the coast of Devon

Adorable photographs capture a herd of playful seals performing underwater aquatics just off the coast of Devon. In one image a cute grey seal can be seen clutching a strand of seaweed and giving the camera an inquisitive look, while another shows a seal mid back-flip close to the ocean floor.

 A cute grey seal can be seen clutching a strand of seaweed.
A cute grey seal can be seen clutching a strand of seaweed. Image by Alexander Mustard / NPL / mediadrumworld.com

These heart-warming snaps were taken by underwater photographer Alexander Mustard (41) from Peterborough, who caught up with the seals on Lundy Island in Devon. “When the seals are in a playful mood it is tremendous fun,” said Alexander. “I have found that the best way to attract them in close is to totally ignore them so I like to stare at the seaweed instead. “This seems to make them jealous and they soon overcome their shyness.”

Playful seals performing underwater aquatics just off the coast of Devon.
Playful seals performing underwater aquatics just off the coast of Devon. Image by Alexander Mustard / NPL / mediadrumworld.com

Lundy Island is the perfect spot to capture these lively creatures and the island is home to approximately two-hundred grey Atlantic seals. Other images show the fun-loving seals poking their heads out of the water and peering into the camera lens, some even baring their teeth playfully. Alexander considers himself lucky to have photographed and interacted with these animals.

These heart-warming snaps were taken by underwater photographer Alexander Mustard (41) .
These heart-warming snaps were taken by underwater photographer Alexander Mustard (41) . Image by Alexander Mustard / NPL / mediadrumworld.com

“Being accepted by wildlife is always a fulfilling sensation but when the wildlife then chooses to interact with you it is even better,” he explained. The marine life on Lundy Island has been protected under law since 1986 and previously as a voluntary Marine Nature Reserve since 1973. “The British seas are full of life, especially in the areas we protect from over exploitation,” Alexander added. “Lundy is a great example of this and it is one of the reasons that there is a healthy population of these amazing marine mammals there now.”

By Zoe Cassell/Media Drum World