Lonely Planet Writer

Modern travel has made most places accessible, but these are the world's hardest-to-reach places

Modern travel is so fast and powerful that you can get to most places on earth within 24 hours. There are still some places that are hard to reach though, and a new video has been compiled by RealLifeLore to show us the places that are the most difficult to access.

Palm tree and huts on tropical beach. Image: Trinette Reed
Palm tree and huts on tropical beach. Image: Trinette Reed

There are even some where no one in human history has ever visited at all, so if you’re looking for a challenge for your next adventure, read on.

Pitcairn Island

Pitcairn Island is home to 49 people. Image: Official Pitcairn Islands Tourism
Pitcairn Island is home to 49 people. Image: Official Pitcairn Islands Tourism

Pitcairn Island is a British-owned tropical island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean and it is home to 49 people. The nearest airport is 531 miles away on the island of Mangareva, but there is only one flight a week to there from Tahiti and it takes five hours. A boat brings supplies from Mangareva to Pitcairn once every three months and it takes 32 hours. A return trip costs $5000. If you fancy moving to Pitcairn, they will give you a free plot of land to build your house on.

Kerguelen Islands

This mountain peak on Kerguelen Islands is one of the most remote places to access in the world. Image: RealLifeLore
This mountain peak on Kerguelen Islands is one of the most remote places to access in the world. Image: RealLifeLore

These islands are also known as the Desolation Islands and are located in the middle of the Indian Ocean. They are 3300 km from their nearest populated neighbour, Madagascar, and there are 50-100 scientists living there at all times. The Kerguelen Islands are visited every three months by one ship from Reunion Island, and the trip takes six days. There is a mountain peak on the island that is 1850 m tall, and very few people have ever reached the summit, so it is considered one of the most remote places in the world.

 

Mount Sidley

Mount Sidley. Image: RealLifeLore
Mount Sidley. Image: RealLifeLore

Mount Sidley is the tallest volcano in Antarctica at 4284 m high, and is located in the most remote part, known as Marie Byrd Land. It is so remote that no sovereign country currently claims it. Antarctica is already hard enough to reach with no regularly-scheduled flights from anywhere in the world. Only two expeditions have ever reached the summit of the volcano.