Lonely Planet Writer

A colorblind artist has filled Atlanta's High Museum of Art with incredible blue installations

A colorblind artist has brought an incredible burst of color to Atlanta’s High Museum of Art, with new installations in bright shades.

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Perrotin.
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Perrotin. Image by Guillaume Ziccarelli

The works are by artist Daniel Arsham, and combine audio, architecture, sculpture, installation and performance. Ashram is colorblind and his previous works often stuck to a palette of black, white, and grey tones. However, special glasses that refract light have allowed him to see a broader spectrum of color – and his new exhibition reflects that.  

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Perrotin.
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Perrotin. Image by Guillaume Ziccarelli

“Life is definitely more nuanced, but I’m not sure it’s more interesting. I feel like I’m inside a game—an overly saturated world,” said Arsham in a news release. “But now I’ve arrived at a point where I’m using color as another tool in my work. This is a unique project for me in that there is a ton of color, so I think it’s going to be really interesting to see audiences react.”

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Perrotin.
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Perrotin. Image by Guillaume Ziccarelli

The three interrelated installations are called “Daniel Arsham: Hourglass” and are on display at the museum until 21 May. 

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Perrotin.
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Perrotin. Image by Guillaume Ziccarelli

The first installation of the trio features objects inside of large hourglasses, which are filled with crushed crystal that slowly obscures the items inside. On Sundays, each hour a young performer will turn the glasses in order to reveal what is within.

Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Perrotin.
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Perrotin. Image by Guillaume Ziccarelli

Another installation takes visitors into a monochromatic blue Zen garden that features a Japanese tea house, tatami mats, a petrified tree and ornately raked sand. On Sundays there will also be a performer there wearing traditional robes and raking patterns into the garden’s sand.

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