Lonely Planet Writer

A goat yoga class on a farm in Oregon has become a runaway success

Forget downward dog – an Oregon farm has just launched an exciting new program to entice visitors to the Willamette Valley—goat yoga.

goat yoga
Visitors can take a yoga class while surrounded by a herd of goats.  Image by Lainey Dyer

The programme is exactly what it sounds like: a yoga class held on a farm with some very free-range goats joining in the fun. “I have a yoga teacher come in and I supply the atmosphere and the goats,” Lainey Morse-Dyer, who hosts the class at her No Regrets Farm in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, told Lonely Planet.  The class lets practicing yogis find their inner peace by kicking back in Warrior Two pose with goats in a rolling green field with views of Oregon’s coastal mountain range in the distance. “The whole atmosphere is extremely relaxing,” explains Morse-Dyer.

The goats act as therapy animals for the yogis.
The goats act as therapy animals for the yogis. Image by Lainey Dyer

The idea of adding goat yoga to the farm—located a little over an hour from Portland, Oregon—came about when a local yoga instructor asked if she could hold a class in one of the farm’s fields. “I thought it was a great idea,” Morse-Dyer wrote. “And thus Goat Yoga was born.”

The farm is located in in Oregon’s Willamette Valley.
The farm is located in in Oregon’s Willamette Valley. Image by Lainey Dyer

For just $10 a class, yogis get to practice their tree poses while goats join in the fun, sitting on the yoga mats, and try to entice attendees away from their downward-facing dog poses into a little head-scratching of goats. “They can be a little distracting,” admits Morse-Dyer, who says that it’s not just her lovable goats that get in on the fun—sometimes her barn cat and chickens join the action too.

Goats wander around as yogis perform their poses.
Goats wander around as yogis perform their poses. Image by Lainey Dyer

The farm, which is situated in the middle of Oregon’s idyllic wine country, currently houses six goats, including two Nigerian Dwarf mini goats—Ansel and Adams—as well as a rescued Boer goat named Dodger, and two Pygmy mini-goats. Morse-Dyer plans to launch a line of goat milk food and beauty products to sell at the farm as well as the local shops and farmers’ markets that sell locally-produced food and the area’s revered wines.

Sometimes her barn cat and chickens join the action.
Sometimes her barn cat and chickens join the action.  Image by Lainey Dyer

The fact that animal-loving yogis are flocking to Morse-Dyer’s farm is particularly surprising, because she is not one of them. “I actually don’t practice yoga!” she says “Isn’t that funny? Maybe I better start.”

So far Goat Yoga has been a runaway success and Morse-Dyer continues adding classes to the schedule to meet the growing demand for the unusual activity. The class schedule is posted to the farm’s Facebook page (Your Daily Goat, naturally) making it easy for daytrippers to add Goat Yoga to their agenda.