Lonely Planet Writer

Swedish photographer captures colourful meteor while shooting Northern Lights

A Swedish photographer was thrilled when he went out to photograph the Northern Lights, and managed to capture a green meteor in the sky. Thirty-four-year-old Johan Vilhelm Löfgren had set up his camera on the road along the banks of the Lake Hjälmaren in Sweden to observe the night sky, and when the celestial spectacle suddenly occurred, he managed to photograph it.

Photographer Johan Vilhelm Löfgren was delighted to snap this meteor. Image: Johan Vilhelm Fotosida
Photographer Johan Vilhelm Löfgren was delighted to snap this meteor. Image: Johan Vilhelm Fotosida

Johan was happy with his night’s work capturing the colourful scenes of the Aurora Borealis, and was just about to pack up and return to his hometown of Örebro when the meteor came through. Caused by a particle broken off an asteroid or comet orbiting the sun that burns up as it enters the earth’s atmosphere, it suddenly appeared as a flash of light in the night sky. Johan just happened to press the button at the ideal moment, and said he was overjoyed when he realised he had captured the phenomenon.

 

The Aurora Borealis is caused by charged solar particles interacting with the earth’s magnetic field and Scandinavia, particularly the Lapland areas of Norway, Sweden and Finland, is considered to be very good for aurora viewing. Johan had been alerted to the possibility of the sighting of the lights by a Facebook group he follows, but the appearance of this meteor came as an added bonus. The amateur photographer described afterwards how the shooting star flashed and sparkled in the sky just after his magical photo was taken.