Lonely Planet Writer

A graveyard for abandoned jets in Bangkok has become an unlikely tourist attraction

A photographer has shared captivating images from Thailand that show the remnants of two large abandoned jets.

The abandoned jet "graveyard" in Bangkok, Thailand.
The abandoned jet “graveyard” in Bangkok, Thailand. Image by Dax Ward / Barcroft Media

Formerly operated by Orient Thai Airlines, the deserted MD-82 jetliners remain in place following a failed business venture. They can be seen at the site in Bangkok which has become somewhat of an unconventional tourist attraction, with curious travellers going to see the skeletal remains for themselves.

Visitors to the site can see inside the skeleton of the MD-82 planes.
Visitors to the site can see inside the skeleton of the MD-82 planes.

36-year old Photographer Dax Ward captured the images on a trip recently. “The planes were supposedly placed there a few years ago by a foreign investor who wanted to create a special outdoor bar using the fuselage as a stage for bands and the service rooms for the bar crew. The project was a fiasco and the investor left the site as it is.”

Graffiti artists have ventured to the site to add their mark to the planes.
Graffiti artists have ventured to the site to add their mark to the planes. Image by Dax Ward / Barcroft Media

Ward also said that there are no plans to move the planes, despite the fact that the land that they sit on is valuable.

It is reported that the site is operated by a woman that lives there in a converted fuselage.
It is reported that the site is operated by a woman that lives there in a converted fuselage. Image by Dax Ward / Barcroft Media

The site is operated by a local woman who lives there in a converted fuselage and charges an entry fee of 300 baht per person.

Oxygen masks, safety manuals and other debris can also be seen scattered around the site.
Oxygen masks, safety manuals and other debris can also be seen scattered around the site. Image by Dax Ward / Barcroft Media

The registration numbers on the two planes have been painted over, making it difficult to tell when they were officially retired from operation. The interiors of the planes have been mostly stripped away also, revealing the bones of the crafts while carpeting and overhead bins remain intact. Oxygen masks, safety manuals and other debris can also be seen scattered around the site.

The site has become a favourite tourist destination and charges 300 Baht for entry.
The site has become a favourite tourist destination and charges 300 Baht for entry. Image by Dax Ward / Barcroft Media

“It is very eerie. There are children’s toys and other personal objects scattered around, left by people who have stayed there for whatever reason, almost making it feel like a crash site. In Thai culture places like this are often seen as haunted, even if no one has actually passed away at the location!” Ward said.

The photographer described the site as "eerie" and said that many Thai people consider it to be haunted.
The photographer described the site as “eerie” and said that many Thai people consider it to be haunted. Image by Dax Ward / Barcroft Media

Although the site is somewhat eerie, the photographer enjoyed getting the chance to get up close and personal with the planes. “I’m not familiar with aeronautical design, so it is interesting for me to see the different levels in the plane and to get a sense of its actual size. It is a truly impressive feat in engineering and physics that allows for such large, heavy objects to be propelled through the sky at high speeds.”