Lonely Planet Writer

Taiwan’s newest museum dubbed the ‘Louvre of Buddhist art’

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A newly opened museum in Taiwan has been called the ‘Louvre’ of Buddhist art for its vast collections of statues, sutras, writings and illustrations. TheChung Tai Chan World Museum opened this week as part of the Chung Tai Chan Temple in Puli, central Taiwan.

Red lion and chinese Buddha of the Chung-tai Chan monastery in Taiwan
Red lion and chinese Buddha of the Chung-tai Chan monastery in Taiwan Image by real444

Eighteen exhibition halls display a wide variety of art collected from around the Buddhist world. The museum – which was designed in a Tang-dynasty Buddhist architectural style that originated in Xi’an – was gifted more than 1200 stelae rubbings by the Forest of Stelae Museum.

Construction began on the museum in 2013 at the behest of now-deceased Master Wei Chueh, the founder of the Chung Tai Chan monastery. According to the Taipei Times, the museum said that the “exhibitions are arranged in three main categories — individual writings, pictures and drawings, and sutras — to show that writing preserves ideas and thought, images allow later generations to verify if they are on the right path and sutras pass on truths”.