Lonely Planet Writer

See famous works of art from Paris museums reimagined by Instagrammers

More Instagrammers are going beyond the usual selfies and pictures of food to turn their accounts into works of art – so it’s no surprise that a group of Paris museums had 10 popular posters remake famous artworks in order to promote the museums’ new online collection.

A photo posted by Paris Musées (@parismusees) on May 11, 2016 at 5:19am PDT

A photo posted by Paris Musées (@parismusees) on May 11, 2016 at 5:54am PDT

Paris Musées, an organization that represents 14 City of Paris museums, has launched a new online archive to open up the museums’ collections to people around the world, including potential future visitors.

A photo posted by Paris Musées (@parismusees) on May 10, 2016 at 10:36am PDT

A photo posted by Paris Musées (@parismusees) on May 10, 2016 at 10:40am PDT

They had 10 Instagrammers with different styles to reinterpret famous works of art, posting them online with the hashtag #parallelesparismusees. The artists included photographers, fashion bloggers, visual artists and YouTube comedians, who reinvented the chosen works in a variety of ways.

A photo posted by Paris Musées (@parismusees) on May 11, 2016 at 1:30am PDT

A photo posted by Paris Musées (@parismusees) on May 11, 2016 at 1:33am PDT

The reinterpretations include works from the Carnavelet Museum, the Petit Palais, Musée de la Vie romantique, Maison de Victor Hugo, Musée d’Art Moderne and more. The works will also be on display in real life at Saint-Lazare railway station until 31 July.

A photo posted by Paris Musées (@parismusees) on May 13, 2016 at 1:15am PDT

A photo posted by Paris Musées (@parismusees) on May 13, 2016 at 1:39am PDT

More museums are trying to harness the power of Instagram to inspire visitors to see their collections in person. The Renwick Gallery, a branch of the Smithsonian Art Museum in Washington, recently broke away from some museums’ photography bans and encouraged visitors to take pictures of the art in its exhibit entitled WONDER, which visitors eagerly embraced.

A photo posted by Paris Musées (@parismusees) on May 18, 2016 at 3:21am PDT

A photo posted by Paris Musées (@parismusees) on May 18, 2016 at 3:24am PDT

Some museums have also used Instagram to work with other organizations to promote their collections, such as in a New York, where museums took part in an ‘Instaswap’, in which staff from some of New York’s most popular cultural institutions visited others and posted their discoveries online.