Lonely Planet Writer

National Trust offers a £1m Welsh farm for a year in exchange for £1 in rent and a lot of hard work

Ever wished that a one in a million chance would land at your doorstep sometime?

The new tenant who will take over Parc Farm will have to look after a large flock of sheep
The new tenant who will take over Parc Farm will have to look after a large flock of sheep Image by Ed Webster / CC BY 2.0

Well now’s your chance as for the princely sum of £1 you could rent a £1m farm in Wales for a year.  There is a rider attached though – the would-be tenant must promise to look after “the fragile landscape” on offer as well watch over a large flock of sheep. According to the BBC, the National Trust is offering this once in a lifetime opportunity to rule over Parc Farm on the top of Great Orme, which is situated near Llandudno. The Trust had to step in itself last year to protect the property and now wants somebody of like mind to take up the cudgel so that the land can recover.

The National Trust is seeking a shepherd to be with the sheep when they are grazing in areas that have been neglected
The National Trust is seeking a shepherd to be with the sheep when they are grazing in areas “of fragile landscape.” Image by Roger Davies. / CC BY 2.0

The farm also contains rare habitats and species – so rare in fact that the National Trust believes they don’t exist anywhere else across the globe. The delicate requirements for this coastal headland estate needs a gentle, nature-first approach which definitely goes against the way modern farming operates. The charity says that the most fragile habitats will only recover if very specific grazing regimes are implemented. General manager William Greenwood said that means less grazing on the most productive pastureland agriculturally, while ironically, the least used acres will need to be grazed more.

To regularly move sheep across the entire farm will require long hours of shepherding. This could be difficult on a terrain which also manages to attract somewhere in the region of 600,000 visitors to the Great Orme area every year. Mr Greenwood explained that this will require a tenant to buy into a farm philosophy which promotes a healthy wildlife while encouraging those visiting to act for the good of nature. To motivate such thinking, he said they will remove the financial pressure of needing rent for the land, the grazing and the farmhouse each year. The new tenant is expected to take over in the autumn.