Lonely Planet Writer

A message in a bottle thrown into the sea in Scotland is found by a seven-year-old girl in Norway

A message in a bottle thrown into the sea in Scotland by a 10-year-old girl managed to make its way across the North Sea, and was recently discovered by a seven-year-old in Norway.

Seven-year-old Signe Rege from Askvoll Norway found a message in a bottle washed up on a small island.
Seven-year-old Signe Rege from Askvoll Norway found a message in a bottle washed up on a small island. Image by Cullen Bay Hotel

The message – written on pink paper with lots of glitter added – was dropped in the sea by a young girl taking a holiday in a Scottish coastal village about six months ago and washed ashore on a small island on the west coast of Norway.

The letter said: “Hello those who have found this letter in a bottle, my name is Eva Sweenie and I am 10 years old. I am on my holidays in Cullen, who knows where you are. It’s 2015 October the 16th and this is a beautiful day. That’s all I have to say apart from safe travels. Bye bye xx”.

According to a Facebook post from the Cullen Bay Hotel in Scotland, the bottle was discovered by a young Norwegian girl named Signe. Her parents got in touch because their daughter wanted to track down Eva and send her a letter. As there was no address on her message, they contacted the hotel to try and find the girl. The hotel posted the information on Facebook, which quickly led to the letter’s author, after someone posted that they knew Eva’s family.

Both the girls are excited about continuing their correspondence, reports Scottish paper the Press and Journal. Eva’s family will even be returning to Cullen for their holiday this year and plan to try sending another message out into the world and seeing what comes of it.

Earlier this month, the world’s oldest message in a bottle washed up in Germany after more than 108 years at sea. The bottle had been thrown into the North Sea back in 1906 with a postcard inside asking it be sent to the Marine Biological Association of the UK, with a promise to send a shilling to whoever sends it back. Apparently, the bottle was one of about 1000 released in the mane of marine research.