Lonely Planet Writer

Skyscrapers seen from above: breathtaking photos of Hong Kong's skyline taken in the blue hour

Photos of the Hong Kong skyline are drawing gasps for their exquisite beauty.

The crowded skyline of Hong Kong
The crowded skyline of Hong Kong Image by Andy Yeung

Photographer Andy Yeung has created a series of images of his home city using a drone to capture the densely populated downtown region.  He explains he was inspired to take the photos when he was on a flight home from Europe:  “When I was travelling back, I had an intimate aerial view of Hong Kong from above. Looking down, I saw gazillions of buildings soaring high into the skies and the idea of creating a drone series offering a glimpse into the reality of living in one of the most densely populated areas of the world just sprung to my mind”.

Urban Jungle - the city of Hong Kong is home to 7 million
Urban Jungle – the city of Hong Kong is home to 7 million Image by Andy Yeung

The images, which were taken by Yeung using a drone, were captured at the blue hour. Yeung describes it as the period of twilight during dawn each morning and dusk each evening when the sun is a significant distance below the horizon and the residual, indirect sunlight takes on a predominantly blue hue.

A drone was used to capture the skyline from above
A drone was used to capture the skyline from above Image by Andy Yeung

The images capture the eerie stillness of the buildings that are home over seven million people. “I hope this series can get people to think about the high-density living in one of the world’s richest cities and the message that I’m trying to send is that Hong Kong is a great city, but lurking beneath the prosperity is a severe housing problem that depresses every dweller in this city living in horrid conditions,” he told Lonely Planet.

The images were captured in the blue hour; the period of twilight during dawn each morning and dusk
The images were captured in the blue hour; the period of twilight during dawn each morning and dusk Image by Andy Yeung

This series of images follows Yeung’s last collection called Look Up which featured skyscrapers taken from ground level.  He explains: “it’s about getting people to stop lowering their heads looking at their smart phones and start looking up and appreciating the buildings they see every day.”