Lonely Planet Writer

Can caffeine bracelet stir it up for traditional cuppa?

Could there be a way to get a caffeine boost other than by the traditional cuppa?

A cup of coffee is one of the traditional ways users get a caffeine 'hit'
A cup of coffee is one of the traditional ways users get a caffeine ‘hit’ Image by Jo Fothergill / CC BY-SA 2.0

“Yes” say the inventors of a revolutionary new caffeine bracelet called Joule which takes its cue from patches by releasing elements through the skin into the blood stream.

A cuppa (tea) also contains caffeine and is a popular pick-me-up
A cuppa (tea) also contains caffeine and is a popular pick-me-up Image by Tom Godber / CC BY-SA 2.0

And while many will say that few things compare to actually drinking a cup of tea or coffee for a mid-morning pick-me-up or late-night stay awake aid, those behind the new device may – on the other hand – have solved the problems of coffee breath, stained teeth and the time wasted queuing at Starbucks.

Starbucks is a popular spot for coffee drinkers but Joule would mean no queuing up for a cuppa
Starbucks is a popular spot for coffee drinkers but Joule would mean no queuing up for a cuppa Image by Marco Paköeningrat / CC BY-SA 2.0

Mirror.co.uk website reports that instead of drinking a cuppa, we will be fed the caffeine stimulant, similar to how Nicorette patches work.

The silicone bracelet works through a process called transdermal administration of chemicals.

By embedding the caffeine in an adhesive patch, there is a controlled release through the user’s skin.

This occurs because the heat of the body melts away the layers of formulation, according to Joule on its indigogo crowdfunding site.

As caffeine is fat soluble and small, it is ideal for the purpose. And the Joule has about the same effect as a cup of coffee so there is no chance that your system will be shocked by absorbing too much.

However, even if you want to continue drinking your favourite brew, you can use Joule in conjunction with the traditional cup of tea or coffee.

Adam Paulin, who is a personal trainer with a B Sc (Hons) in neuroscience and psychology invented the Joule and launched it together with Dr Alex Kryuk, a a Ph D in medicine and a medical doctor.