Lonely Planet Writer

Online tour celebrates Liverpool and The Beatles

Go on a ‘magical mystery tour’ through the past and present of Liverpool, the birthplace of The Beatles, with an interactive online tour.

Composite images of Liverpool show how the city has changed over time.
Composite images of Liverpool show how the city has changed over time. Image by Evolving Cities

This week marks an important anniversary for The Beatles – it has been 55 years since their first performance at the Cavern Club in Liverpool. The now-legendary venue hosted nearly 300 performances by the Fab Four, but it all started on 9 February 1961 with a lunchtime show.

Composite images of Liverpool show how the city has changed over time.
Composite images of Liverpool show how the city has changed over time. Image by Evolving Cities

To mark the occasion, Evolving Cities has released the interactive timeline, which takes online travellers through seven past-to-present images of popular areas and landmarks in Liverpool, synced to a Spotify playlist of some of The Beatles’ songs. Google Maps allows users to find the landmarks on a map and even wander inside the Cavern Club. The Evolving Cities campaign launched last year and highlights how cities have changed overtime, and in Liverpool’s case, shows the impact of music on how the city has developed.

Composite images of Liverpool show how the city has changed over time.
Composite images of Liverpool show how the city has changed over time. Image by Evolving Cities

The tour features interesting facts about each of the sites, such as noting that in 1992, Ringo Starr returned to visit the Cavern Club and signed the stage wall, but the signature was accidentally cleaned off by a member of the maintenance team.

The tour delves into the non-Beatles history of the city, adding information on some other tourist attractions, such as Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral, which is the largest cathedral in Britain and fifth in the world.

Composite images of Liverpool show how the city has changed over time.
Composite images of Liverpool show how the city has changed over time. Image by Evolving Cities

Fans of The Beatles continue to flock to the city to connect with landmarks like Penny Lane and Strawberry Field. Liverpool City Council release a report this week noting how much The Beatles and their legacy still contribute to the city’s economy, which they value at £82 million annually.

Take the online tour here.

Read more: New statue of The Beatles unveiled in Liverpool

Ten essential travel destinations for Beatlemaniacs

A Fab Four fan’s guide to Liverpool & the Beatles