Lonely Planet Writer

Aussie travellers know best how to get more for dollar

Australians are the best air travellers when it comes to getting value for money on “extras” during flights, according to latest research.

Australians are most likely to say no to "extras" on short  and longer haul flights according to latest research
Australians are most likely to say no to “extras” on short and longer haul flights according to latest research Image by Austrian Airlines / CC BY 2.0

The study on Expedia.com.au spoke to over 11,000 passengers in their survey and found that 43% of Australians refused to buy anything if a journey was less than three hours duration.  Those who did shell out for an add-on expense, put extra legroom as top of their list (20%), with less than one in five opting for a meal (16%) and only 4% interested in paying for a wider seat. The Advertiser in Adelaide reported that even when it came to longer haul flights, Aussies were cleverest in the way they spent their money, according to the findings.

Travellers more likely to shell out for extra leg room on a short-haul flight than any other "extra" on offer
Travellers more likely to shell out for more leg room on a short-haul flight than any other “extra” on offer Image by Iwan Gabovitch / CC BY 2.0

Kelly Cull, Expedia travel expert, felt the findings were along expected lines. She pointed out that Australians were known to be passionate about travel and once they had the basic comforts of travel on a plane, they wanted to maximize the spending of their hard-earned dollar elsewhere. Australian travellers objected most to baggage fees with almost two in every three people choosing to fly with free carry-on airlines. This was due to cost but also because passengers preferred not having to queue to reclaim their suitcases, added Ms Cull.

This opposition to add-on costs will not sit well with Tigerair which is due to launch its inaugural overseas flight to Bali in March. Similar to rival Jetstar, Tigerair depends on baggage service, seat selection and drink and food sales in-flight to boost its business. The research shows that Canadians also know the value of when to spend and when to save but Americans were more likely to splash out more on comforts during flights. Indian passengers found it hard to resist an “extra” with only 9% objecting to paying out.