Lonely Planet Writer

Rare wild Amur tiger caught on video in China

The forestry department China’s northeastern Heilongjiang Province, recently captured footage of a wild Amur tiger at a local nature reserve.

The forestry department in Muling City, northeast China's Heilongjiang Province, has recently captured footage of a wild Amur tiger at a local nature reserve.
The forestry department in Muling City, northeast China’s Heilongjiang Province, has recently captured footage of a wild Amur tiger at a local nature reserve. Image by YouTube Newswire

Amur tigers, also known as Siberian tigers, once lived in the Russian Far East, northern China and the Korean peninsula, according the World Wildlife Fund. But by the 1940s the animal has been hunted to the edge of extinction, and less than 40 remained in the wild. The population gradually grew by the 1980s to around 500 after some protections were put in place. WWF states that the animals’ habitat is now restriction to a range in Russia and small pockets at the border of China. Amur tigers are considered endangered.

The forestry department in Muling City, northeast China's Heilongjiang Province, has recently captured footage of a wild Amur tiger at a local nature reserve.
The forestry department in Muling City, northeast China’s Heilongjiang Province, has recently captured footage of a wild Amur tiger at a local nature reserve. Image by YouTube Newswire

Watch the video here.