Lonely Planet Writer

Sensor skin patch could spell end to sunburn

A new stretchable skin sensor specifically designed to monitor UV exposure could mean the end of sunburn for holidaymakers.

Sun worshippers face serious health problems if they over exposure their skin without protection
Sun worshippers face serious health problems if they over exposure their skin without protection Image by John Stillwell/PA Wire

Unveiling its new technological advance to fight the dangers of over-exposure to the sun, cosmetics firm L’Oreal believe their product could help users to properly protect themselves against health dangers associated with sun-bathing.

People using a new sunscreen patch will be told when to go into the shade or cover  or put on sunblock if they have over exposed to the sun   Image by Steve Parsons/PA Wire
People using a new sunscreen patch will be told when it is time to go into the shade or cover or put on sunblock if they have stayed out too long in the sun Image by Steve Parsons/PA Wire

The MailOnline reports that the patch is being launched in the US this summer where the emphasis will be placed on how the patch can significantly reduce skin cancer.

The device works by monitoring a person’s time in the sun before sending signals and readings to a connected app. The high-tech sensor resembles a small band aid and is half the thickness of a strand of hair. It contains photosensitive dyes that factor in your baseline skin tone and changes colour when you are exposed to UV rays.

Users can check on their levels of exposure by taking a picture of the patch on their smartphones before uploading them to the new app.

At that stage, the wearer is advised to head for the shade, take a break or quickly apply more suncream.

The patch is being launched at a time when skin cancer and the importance of covering up when on sun holidays has become a major health issue. Up to 90% of non-melanoma cancers can be traced to overexposure to UV radiation from the sun.

The new mobile app will become available on iOS and Android when it is launched within the next six months.

Consultant dermatologist to The London Clinic, Dr Christopher Rowland Payne, believes the device could act as a motivation for holidaymakers to control their sun exposure. He said it was an “ingenious way” of getting the information to the people on safe sun exposure.