Best hotels and hostels in Western Sahara

  • Lodging in Dakhla

    Dakhla Attitude

    The first of Dakhla's kitesurfing camps has now evolved into an expansive and very comfortable resort with breezy hillside bungalows, an excellent restaurant and a sandy beachfront bar attended by quite possibly the most laid-back dogs in all Morocco. It's a true destination resort with yoga, massage and activities for children, and has a prime location right on the lagoon.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Dakhla

    Ocean Vagabond

    Ocean Vagabond draws Euro yuppies with brilliant ocean views, a beach bar, yoga, massage pavilions and a pleasing Instagram vibe. Villas and bungalows are stylish, and the focus on providing a brilliant kitesurfing experience is maximised with a well-stocked gear shop and lessons from world champion kitesurfers.

  • Lodging in Dakhla

    Zenith Dakhla

    Located across the road from the lagoon, this German-owned kitesurfing resort wows with elegant design features, including a swimming pool, a restaurant with soaring ceilings and furniture crafted from recycled timber. The chic design continues to the rooms and villas with rainforest outdoor showers, cooling tones and classy bathrooms.

  • Lodging in Dakhla

    Dar Rio Oro

    This multistorey townhouse a short walk north of Dakha's waterfront has a variety of comfortable and stylish rooms and mini-apartments with kitchen facilities. Some rooms share bathrooms, but only ever with one other guest room. The decor incorporates traditional Berber motifs and the rooftop terrace provides great views, especially at sunset. Excursions and rental cars can be arranged.

  • Lodging in Dakhla

    Westpoint

    Popular with swish Moroccan tourists, the Westpoint features 30 stylish en-suite bungalows, some right on the ocean. There's a nice pool with a volleyball net, a wonderful restaurant and an adjacent public beach with excellent waves for surfing. Rooms with a garden view are the least expensive, but you do sacrifice some privacy.

  • Lodging in Dakhla

    Hotel Al Baraka

    Located a short walk from good restaurants, the rooms at the Al Baraka still retain that minty-fresh just-opened ambience. Big-screen TVs provide access to a planet's worth of satellite services and rooms on the top floor have a glimmer of ocean view. Hotel manager Abdo is very responsive, but other staff can struggle with simple requests.

  • Lodging in Laayoune

    Hôtel Al Massira

    If you find yourself stuck in Laayoune and in need of some peace and quiet, you could do worse than the Massira's calm, spacious rooms, set above an expansive foyer and palm-filled courtyard. Because most guests have expense accounts, things are a little overpriced.

  • Lodging in Laayoune

    Sahara Line Hotel

    A UN favourite, the Sahara Line has carpeted, comfortable rooms in blonde wood with fridge, bathroom and TV. There’s a restaurant on the top floor, and staff speak good English.

  • Lodging in Dakhla

    Camping Vignt-Cinq

    It's the chillest vibe imaginable at this tented camp, well-suited to that rare animal: the kitesurfer on a budget. Proprietor Sidatee and his family hang out in their tent while campers live the dream riding waves or – you guessed it – chilling out on the beach. It's best suited for the self-sufficient, with their own kitesurfing gear and meal-prep kit.

  • Lodging in Dakhla

    Hôtel Erraha

    The Erraha’s spacious rooms are decorated in a chintzy fashion you might associate with a matronly relative, and the space adjoins a mosque that draws the devout. Bathrooms are a grim affair, with broken appliances and peeling paint. Despite welcoming staff, unless you arrive late into the nearby grand-taxi station there are better options in town.

  • Lodging in Laayoune

    Hôtel Parador

    This survivor from Spanish days, built in hacienda style around gardens and a pretty fountain, has a faintly colonial bar and a decent restaurant. The rooms are done up in muted mauves, and some open onto a pleasant courtyard. Check a few before committing, as cleanliness is sometimes an issue. It's a serene spot, but wildly overpriced.

  • Lodging in Laayoune

    Hôtel Nagjir

    Beyond its grand reception in mosaic tile, the four-star Nagjir has a restaurant and scruffy rooms. If you're in a kitsch mood there is also a suite with a pleather and diamanté queen bed with views over the dusty plaza below. It has another ’70s-style hotel, Nagjir Plage, by the sandy beach at Foum El Oued, 22km from town.

  • Lodging in Dakhla

    Hôtel Sahara

    The Sahara's dingy rooms have little balconies overlooking men milling about and sitting in cafes (women will attract a lot of attention here). The basic options share showers and squat toilets; the better-value en-suite rooms have sit-down toilets and TVs.

  • Lodging in Laayoune

    Hôtel Jodesa

    Behind its dilapidated two-tone facade and a cafe full of loitering men, this central cheapie has basic but reasonably spacious rooms. If you're a light sleeper, ask for a room at the back of the building.