Attractions

Square in Spanish Town

Parade

Spanish Town’s finest old buildings enfold this square (more formally known as Emancipation Sq).
Church in Spanish Town

St Jago de la Vega Cathedral

Built in 1714, this is the oldest Anglican cathedral in the Caribbean, boasting an impressive beamed ceiling, and a magnificent stained-glass window behind the altar. The church stands on the site of one of the firs…
Landmark in Spanish Town

Iron Bridge

At the bottom of Barrett St, turn left onto Bourkes Rd and follow it east to the narrow Iron Bridge spanning the Rio Cobre. The span was made of cast iron prefabricated at Colebrookdale, England, and was erected in …
Notable Building in Spanish Town

House of Assembly

On the eastern side of Parade Sq is the redbrick House of Assembly, erected in 1762 and today housing the offices of the St Catherine Parish Council. It has a beautiful wooden upper story with a pillar-lined balcony…
Library in Spanish Town

National Archives

The building behind the Rodney Memorial is the National Archives, with national documents dating back centuries, including the proclamation of the abolition of slavery.
Monument in Spanish Town

Rodney Memorial

Dominating Parade Sq on the north side is the elaborate Rodney Memorial, built in honor of Admiral George Rodney, who crowned his four-year service as commander-in-chief of the West Indian Naval Station in 1782 when…
Museum in Spanish Town

People’s Museum of Crafts & Technology

The stables of the Old King's House are home to the People’s Museum of Crafts & Technology. A reconstructed smith’s shop and an eclectic array of artifacts – from Indian corn grinders to coffee-making machinery …
Historic Site in Spanish Town

Courthouse Ruins

On the south side of Parade Sq you pass the fenced-off Courthouse Ruins, destroyed in 1986 by fire. The Georgian building dates from 1819, when it was used as a chapel and armory, with the town hall upstairs.
Notable Building in Spanish Town

Old King’s House Ruins

On the west side of Emancipation Sq is the porticoed Georgian redbrick facade of the ruins of the Old King’s House, a once-grandiose building erected in 1762 as the official residence of Jamaica’s governors.