Travel with Children

Foreign children will be the source of much amusement and curiosity, which is both a great cultural ice-breaker and, after a while, annoying. Nappies (diapers), powders, baby formula and most medications are widely available, though not necessarily in familiar brands. The hardest thing will be trying to keep children entertained in a country where journeys are long and attractions often rather ‘adult’. Parents should explain fairly clearly to their daughters aged nine or older that they’ll have to wear hejab.

Eating with the family is the norm in Iran, and taking your kids into a restaurant will not only be welcome but can bring you more-attentive service. While few menus include special meals for children, staff often tailor the size of the meal to the size of the child. Most food is not spicy.

If you have small children and plan on using taxis, you’ll probably have to bring your own baby seat. Few vehicles have seatbelts in the back, so it’s worth asking for them when you book. High chairs are rare and childcare agencies and nappy-changing facilities almost non-existent. Breastfeeding in public is not a great idea.