Attractions

Tower in Gorgan

Gorgan Tower

The three-legged giant folly of a tower that sits on Basij Sq like a child's fantasy spacecraft is actually a jerkily revolving restaurant-coffeeshop that spins once in 45 minutes (if you persuade the barista to set…
Historic Building in Gorgan

Taqavi House

This magnificent complex of historic buildings houses the Golestan Miras cultural-tourist office. Ask to peep inside the ‘eight-wife’ harem building – it's not your average bureaucrat’s photocopier cupboard.
Village in Gorgan

Ziyarat Village

In the last 15 years, unfettered building has smothered this once-pretty shepherds' village with the multistorey holiday homes of rich city dwellers, but there are still vestiges of charm up cobbled Emam Reza St, wh…
Islamic Tomb in Gorgan

Imamzadeh Abdollah

The ever-expanding mausoleum complex of one of Imam Reza's many half-brothers contains dazzling mirror work and is fronted by a giant new ogive-arched double gateway on Shohada Sq.
Tower in Gorgan

Imamzadeh-ye Nur

This 12-sided brick tower dating from 1453 overlooks a pretty square in Gorgan’s most interesting area of old alleys. It's surprisingly modest given that it entombs Eshaq ben Musa, a lesser-known half-brother of Ima…
Museum in Gorgan

Gorgan Handicrafts Museum

This recently restored late-Qajar-era house with tiled roofing and gerehchini (wood-lattice multicoloured windows) contains a well-presented, if somewhat generic, museum of local artefacts and ethnographic mannequin…
Mosque in Gorgan

Masjed-e Jameh

Built around a quadrangle in the bustling (but not dome-covered) bazaar, this attractive 15th-century mosque has blue-tiled portals, sections of traditionally tiled roof and a distinctive, Mazandarani-style capped m…
Forest in Gorgan

Nahar Khoran

Just beyond Gorgan's southern city limits, Nahor Khoran is an area of woodlands and gurgling streams offering an easy, clean-air escape from the city centre – albeit one crowded with weekenders and adorned with litt…
Museum in Gorgan

Gorgan Palace Museum

In the mid 20th-century the Pahlavis swept away a former Safavid precursor to build a two-storey palace that, apart from its two Corinthian columns, is an oddly banal, rectilinear construction with a somewhat Sparta…